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Welcome to the technical sessions schedule for the 2015 Annual Fall NEARC Conference. 

NEW THIS YEAR!
 The technical schedule is capable of being sorted by date (i.e, Monday, Nov. 9) or track (i.e. USGS Hydro). You can also search for a presentation title (i.e. Harmonizing the NHD and WBD Datasets in Maine), key term (i.e. NHD), or presenter last name (i.e. O’Neil-Dunne). The sort and search functions can be found on the navigation panel on the right side of this page. If you hover over the "Schedule" button, you’ll also see different schedule view options (i.e. Grid or Simple). Try selecting each of them to see which view you prefer. 

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MAIN NEARC WEBSITE: Click here to return to the main NEARC conference website for poster abstracts, GIS Educators Day schedule, and full conference schedule at-a-glance. 

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Sunday, November 8
 

8:00am

8:30am

9:00am

9:45am

A Potpourri of Strategies to Integrate GIS in Higher Education Courses
Rebecca Boger, Brooklyn College

The rapidly evolving ArcGIS Online (AGO) is changing how GIS is taught in undergraduate and graduate
introductory GIS classes. Additionally, AGO’s more intuitive interface makes integrating GIS in non-GIS classes much easier, decreasing the amount of time students need as prep to be able to use the lessons without frustration. As I make the transition from desktop to online GIS, I am exploring new strategies using face-to-face, online, and blended formats, and developing new materials to integrate the use of GIS in environmental and urban sustainability courses. These strategies include individual and team projects, internships, and collaborations with local organizations in particular, New York City Parks and Recreation. The ESRI Collector App engages the students with their own data collection, analysis and visualization while map stories allow students to be creative in their use of maps, photos, videos and text. These tools, along with others, promote place-based pedagogy while enhancing spatial literacy and systems thinking. In this session, I will share some of my strategies, student projects, as well as qualitative and quantitative evaluations on student learning.

Speakers

Sunday November 8, 2015 9:45am - 10:15am
Green Mountain B

9:45am

Wetland Management and GIS
Paul Crofts, Essex Technical High School

How do you fast track GIS skills in teenagers? Over the last school year students have been
implementing a wetland management plan. In order to set, measure, and analyze measurable goals, students devised strategies through GIS. This legacy project will be inherited by future senior students in our natural resource management class and also brings together junior grades as they collect data in our on-going mission. After basic skills students rapidly learn to manipulate Arcmap in novel and interesting ways.

Speakers

Sunday November 8, 2015 9:45am - 10:15am
Green Mountain A

9:45am

Create a StoryMap with ArcGIS Online! Hands-on Workshop
Margaret Chernosky, Maine Geographic Alliance

Create a StoryMap with ArcGIS Online! You will learn how to construct a place-based, inquiry project using your local data. This is a hands-on workshop that offers practice and inspiration using ArcGIS Online to create Story Maps. Attendees will learn how to create a public account, create, save and share a Story Map. We will provide a step-by-step guide for practice at home. The project satisfies the Common Core and National Geographic Geography for Life 2 standards. Please bring your laptop or tablet.


Sunday November 8, 2015 9:45am - 10:45am
Montpelier

9:45am

Mobile Data Collection: Temperature and Land Cover
Ina Ahern, Plymouth Regional High School/NHEdGIS

How does surface temperature vary with land cover? How does surface temperature compare with air temperature? Sub-surface temperatures? What’s the impact of shading on surface temperature? In this workshop you will learn how to use the ArcGIS Collector app on offline mobile devices to collect temperature data with digital and infrared thermometers, sync your data to an online map and perform basic symbolization. To further explore this collected data, attend the companion workshop "More than a Map: Data Analysis."

Speakers

Sunday November 8, 2015 9:45am - 10:45am
Green Mountain C

10:15am

Improving Student Performance Within the Geospatial Technology Competency Model
John Van Hoesen, Green Mountain College

One measure of assessing student development through any geospatial program is the Geospatial Technology Competency Model (GTCM). However many 4-year colleges aren’t able to support a standalone GIS certificate or program and so often the goal is to ensure coverage of foundational skills described in The GIS 20: Essential Skills by Gina Clemmer. These skills are embedded in the IndustryWide Technical Competencies building block (Tier 4) of the GTCM but how else can students pursuing degrees at institutions with few GIS-related courses? Project Based Learning (PBL) is often used as the platform to engage students beyond the classroom and offers students the opportunity to interact with community partners and peers in an authentic professional environment. The typical PBL model involves identifying a community partner with a specific need or question and incorporating that into an individual course. According to Herrington and Oliver (2000), these singular projects may not be the most effective way to design authentic learning experiences. Another approach is to sequential link a non-geospatial with a geospatial course across the academic year so that students develop a competence in one subject matter domain or topic and then refine their geospatial skills through the lens of that expertise.

Speakers

Sunday November 8, 2015 10:15am - 10:45am
Green Mountain B

10:15am

Mapping Coastal Resilience in Communities
Ann Witzig, Essex Technical High School

Students in the Environmental Technology major at Essex Technical High School measured and mapped the impacts of sea level rise and hurricane storm surges on four towns on the Massachusetts North Shore. The final analysis was presented at a community interest group, Storm Surge, in Newburyport. The ESRI project creating storm surge elevations in coastal Mississippi from Hurricane Katrina assisted the development of bathtub models for sea level rise in Massachusetts. These data presented the communities a measure of their resilience to changing coastal processes over the next century.

Speakers

Sunday November 8, 2015 10:15am - 10:45am
Green Mountain A

11:00am

Story Maps in the Liberal Arts University Classroom
Kim Diver and Jason Simms, Wesleyan University

This presentation discusses a pilot project in which five professors integrated ESRI Story Maps within the curriculum during spring semester 2015 at Wesleyan University, a highly-selective liberal arts university. Multiple disciplines were represented that traditionally have not embraced GIS to a large extent in the classroom, including History, Humanities, and World Languages. Feedback from the professors was generally positive, pointing out ways in which spatial visualization provides new pedagogical opportunities and avenues for collaboration both within and outside of class. Student reactions were mixed, however, with many enthusiastically embracing Story Maps, while others noted that more “traditional” delivery methods, such as PowerPoint and Word, might have been more effective in some cases. We will highlight some of the projects and discuss the outcomes, as well as future plans to leverage Story Maps further in the higher ed classroom.


Sunday November 8, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
Green Mountain B

11:00am

Mapping Field Sketches - ArcGIS Online Maps
Bob Woolner and students; Hopkinton Middle High School

Sketching, GPS-ing, observing and mapping come together in a middle-school student-led workshop, an opportunity to learn from the best. 7th grade students from Hopkinton Middle High School in Contoocook, NH spend 3 days (and 2 nights) hiking, exploring, sketching and learning at the Cardigan State Park, in Alexandria, NH. These students will share how they s-l-o-w down, and notice details that would ordinarily be skipped over, how they gather location data to supplement their journal entries, and ultimately how they map and present their observations. Students will provide mini-sketchbooks to you, help you sketch details, write observations and gather latitude and longitude data. Sketches will be scanned, geo-referenced, and mapped, using ArcGIS online mapping software (free to k-12 educators). YOU will learn from the best- the students themselves.

Speakers

Sunday November 8, 2015 11:00am - 12:00pm
Montpelier

11:00am

PANEL: Arc-GIS Online Practicalities of Professional Development for Educators
Organizer: Cathleen McAnneny, University of Maine Farmington

This panel will discuss the various approaches to professional development in ESRI's Arc GIS online taken throughout New England. Five states are represented and each presenter will provide an overview of the approach taken to address the professional development needs in their respective states. Successes and challenges will be addressed.


Sunday November 8, 2015 11:00am - 12:00pm
Green Mountain A

11:00am

Using ArcGIS Desktop to Create an Editable Feature Service for Field Data Collection with Mobile Devices
Kathryn Keranen, James Madison University

Editable feature services are the key to collaborative data collection and mapping by students. Using an editable feature service multiple collectors can add data to a map simultaneously. In this workshop participants will use ArcGIS desktop to design, construct and publish an editable feature service. Participants will learn how to build a file geodatabase, a feature dataset, and a feature class with established domains.

Speakers

Sunday November 8, 2015 11:00am - 12:00pm
Green Mountain C

11:30am

Synopsis of Abstract Machine Humanities GIS
Jenni Lund, Wheaton College

Abstract Machine Humanities GIS is a new book by literary scholar Charles B. Travis (Esri Press 2015). Travis describes several ways he uses GIS to turbocharge traditional literary analyses. This is quite a different thing from using traditional GIS methods to study humanist topics. In one case study, he creates an attribute table with locations in Dublin and the roles that those locations play in the meaning and metaphor of a novel. In another, he geographically correlates maps from different fictional works to demonstrate how a modern author incorporates the symbolism of a medieval author. It is a slim volume, generously illustrated, written for his fellow humanists. If you are interested in the topic but unfamiliar with humanist terms such as phenomenology, ergodicity and deformance, this synopsis might save you some Googling.

Speakers

Sunday November 8, 2015 11:30am - 12:00pm
Green Mountain B

12:00pm

GIS Educators Day Lunch
Sunday November 8, 2015 12:00pm - 12:45pm
Mezzanine

12:45pm

Keynote Address: The Drones are Coming, and They Want to Provide Imagery for Your GIS
Jarlath O'Neil-Dunne, Director, UVM Spatial Analysis Laboratory

Speakers
JO

Jarlath O'Neil-Dunne

University of Vermont


Sunday November 8, 2015 12:45pm - 1:30pm
Green Mountain Ballroom

1:35pm

2:15pm

Class Group Project: Performing a Market Analysis with ArcGIS Online
Andrew DiGiovanni and Jason Tetu, Lebanon High School

Engage your students with a great application of ArcGIS Online. Challenge groups to act as business relocation firms! After covering topics such as industrial practices, consumerism, the layouts of cities, and socioeconomic trends, the students in AP Geography at Lebanon High School used ArcGIS Online along with research tools to determine what would be the ideal new location for their teacher's fictional whitewater kayak production company. Each team started with key information such as the size requirements of the company facility, including production, office, and retail space. They were also allowed to submit questions about other operational, labor, and production costs to obtain the best location. Teams evaluated site, situation, and market factors to weigh potential locations for the new facility. Then, each made a presentation about the location they picked to a review board. Embedded maps had to show evidence to support the team’s decision. Students chose the appropriate Esri layers to study - drawing upon their experience with finding relationships between various economic and cultural variables for a given region, on a variety of scales, prior to the project. Data within the GIS layers was combined with other information to find population centers that suited the business owner's requirements. Students shared their research on the expected effects of their chosen locations on adjusted costs and growth potential compared to the company's current headquarters, and the new market’s proximity to whitewater access. Come see some of the highlights. Account preparation with ArcGIS Online in advance through ConnectED is recommended (see http://www.esri.com/connected). You'll want to come up with your own version of this exciting project!

Speakers
avatar for Andrew DiGiovanni

Andrew DiGiovanni

Education Technology Integrator, Lebanon High School
Science, music, skiing and sailing.


Sunday November 8, 2015 2:15pm - 2:45pm
Green Mountain B

2:15pm

Mapping LiDAR Data with ArcGIS Desktop
Kathryn Keranen, James Madison University

Lidar (light detection and ranging) is a remote-sensing technique that uses laser light to densely sample the surface of the Earth and generate precise, three-dimensional information about its shape and surface characteristics. LiDAR is used to produce more accurate shoreline maps, make digital elevation models for use in a GIS, assist in emergency response operations, and in many other applications. In this session participants will explore sites for LiDAR download, experience the ease of creating a LiDAR LAS dataset, and use the ArcMap LAS toolbar for visualization and analysis.

Speakers

Sunday November 8, 2015 2:15pm - 3:15pm
Green Mountain C

2:15pm

More than a map: Data analysis in ArcGIS Online
Rebecca Lilja, US Forest Service

Bring your own laptop! Learn how to convert data into information using several spatial analysis tools
available in ArcGIS Online for Organizations. Taking data collected in the previous workshop, “Mobile Data Collection: Temperature and Land cover,” participants will learn interpolate or predict values and overlay data to answer questions. A demonstration of map journals will be given to display the results of the analysis.

Speakers

Sunday November 8, 2015 2:15pm - 3:15pm
Montpelier

2:15pm

PANEL: Developing Student and Institutional Geospatial Literacy in Higher Education
Organizer: Keith Ratner, Salem State University

GIS and the geospatial technologies have a tremendous ability to help understand geographic patterns and processes across the Earth. They also can help make better decisions when managing an institutional facility such as a college or university. Regardless of whether for teaching purposes or facility management, many institutions of higher education are lacking when it comes to GIS and geospatial literacy. This panel addresses both of these issues. First, panelist will present both positive and negative experiences of teaching in higher education using geospatial technologies, as well as, teaching the geospatial technologies themselves. Panelist will also present examples of simple online geospatial tools that can utilized in the classroom. Second, panelists will discuss getting academic institutions more aware of the geospatial technologies in general, whether in regards to increasing its involvement in classes, or to helping to manage the facilities and other aspects of the establishment. The Panel will run with each panelist giving a short presentation before the session is opened up for discussion and suggestions.

Speakers

Sunday November 8, 2015 2:15pm - 3:15pm
Green Mountain A

2:45pm

Story Maps, Local History and Middle Schoolers
Bill Guerette, Presque Isle Middle School

Are you interested in local history, maps and story telling? Story maps combined with interactive maps and multimedia content can create awesome presentations about local history. This presentation will be about one such project. The project is a collaboration between the Presque Isle Airport Museum and Presque Isle Middle School eighth graders. It tells the rich history of the area where the middle school is located. The Story Map explains how it evolved from a grass runway in the 1930's , to an Army Base during WWII, to a launching site for SNARK missiles with nuclear warheads in the late 1950's and finally to the present day uses of the former base.

Speakers

Sunday November 8, 2015 2:45pm - 3:15pm
Green Mountain B

3:30pm

Creating a High School Environmental Studies Course Utilizing ArcGIS Online and ConnectED
Lauren Amaturo, Two Rivers Magnet High School

Participants in this presentation will learn about how an environmental science magnet school in Hartford, CT designed and successfully implemented an environmental studies course focusing on Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The presenters will provide tips and suggestions on how to successfully incorporate Esri's ArcGIS Online program into the secondary school (6-12) classroom. Participants will also gain access to sample lessons and resources that can be used when writing a course in GIS for their local middle or high school.

Speakers
LA

Lauren Amaturo

Two Rivers Magnet High School


Sunday November 8, 2015 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Green Mountain A

3:30pm

Re-Mapping King Philip’s War: Native Geographies in Early Colonial New England
Andy Anderson and Lisa Brooks, Amherst College

This spring Amherst College offered an experimental tutorial to introduce students to research methods in American Studies and Indigenous Studies, focusing on King Philip’s War in early colonial New England. The students read extensive background material, visited archives, and researched primary sources. A large part of the class was learning to apply GIS to help them discover the importance of spatial relationships in the origin, events, and conclusion of the War. This presentation will summarize the lessons they learned and highlight some of their results. It will also feature maps that center regional Native geographies, which may be especially useful for researchers and educators.

Speakers
avatar for Andy Anderson

Andy Anderson

Academic Technology Specialist, Amherst College
Education, history, environment, community engagement
LB

Lisa Brooks

Amherst College


Sunday November 8, 2015 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Green Mountain B

3:30pm

Analyzing populations exposed to nuclear power plants using ArcGIS Online
Dara Mendeloff, Columbia University

The location and status of energy infrastructure, especially in relationship to population and land use,
are important from many perspectives including access to energy, development, environmental impacts on land, air, and water resources, disaster risk management, and mitigation and adaptation to climate change. In this workshop, participants will use ArcGIS Online's current analysis, visualization and presentation tools to explore populations exposed to the world's nuclear power plants.

Speakers

Sunday November 8, 2015 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Montpelier

3:30pm

Census Data for the GIS User: Some tips and tricks for downloading data and shapefiles together
David Kraiker, US Census Bureau

This workshop explains Census Bureau concepts, including data years and geography types, and works
with the class attendees to mine for data within the Census American Factfinder (AFF) portal. It also explains some unorthodox ways of creating and downloading shapefiles directly from AFF. This session is both appropriate for educators and industry GISers. Attendees should bring their laptop.

Speakers
DK

David Kraiker

Data Dissemination Specialist, Census Bureau, NY Office
David Kraiker has worked at the Census Bureau out of the New York City office for the past 18 years. For the past 2 years he has worked in Data Dissemination, teaching and instructing clients in how to download and use Census data. Previously he worked as a Geographer for the Census Bureau, as well as a cartographer at Hammond Maps, Inc. and Geonex. He attended Clark University and Rutgers-Newark. He presently lives in South Orange, NJ... Read More →


Sunday November 8, 2015 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Green Mountain C

4:00pm

Integrating Open Street Map with ArcGIS Online in the Classroom
Noah Ahles and Steve Bower

OpenStreetMap (OSM), often referred to as the ‘Wikipedia of maps’, is an open source map of the world that anyone can contribute to or download from. The OSM platform makes it easy for educators to incorporate spatially oriented projects into the classroom, expose students to new technologies and help them build valuable skills. Projects can range from digitizing the essential infrastructure of one’s hometown to participating in creating a basemap of Nepal’s buildings and road networks to guide humanitarian relief workers in the aftermath of the recent earthquake. This presentation will cover potential projects that can be incorporated into the curriculum and case studies of how OSM has already been used in a classroom setting. Get ready to learn how to use OSM.


Sunday November 8, 2015 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Green Mountain B

4:00pm

The Role of GIS and Social Media in Post-Hurricane Sandy Emergency Response
Katie Marsden, Syracuse University

Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs), particularly social media and geographic
information systems (GIS), have become a transformational force in emergency response. Social media enables ad hoc collaboration, providing timely, useful information dissemination and sharing, and helping to overcome limitations of time and place. Geographic information systems increase the level of situation awareness, serving geospatial data using interactive maps, animations, and computer generated imagery derived from sophisticated global remote sensing systems. Digital workspaces bring these technologies together and contribute to meeting ad hoc and formal emergency response challenges through their affordances of situation awareness and mass collaboration. Distributed ICTs that enable ad hoc emergency response via digital workspaces have arguably made traditional top-down system deployments less relevant in certain situations, including emergency response (Merrill, 2009; Heylighen, 2007a,b). Heylighen (2014, 2007a,b) theorizes that human cognitive stigmergy explains some self-organizing characteristics of ad hoc systems. Elliott (2007) identifies cognitive stigmergy as a factor in mass collaborations supported by digital workspaces. Stigmergy, a term from biology, refers to the phenomenon of self-organizing systems with agents that coordinate via perceived changes in the environment rather than direct communication. The basic assertion is that ICTs and stigmergy together make possible highly effective ad hoc collaborations in circumstances where more typical collaborative methods break down. The research compares the ICTs used for emergency response during Hurricanes Katrina and Sandy, and presents a process model developed from the case studies and relevant academic literature.

Speakers

Sunday November 8, 2015 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Green Mountain A

4:30pm

 
Monday, November 9
 

10:30am

Trail of Two Maps
*Mark Hoover, Connecticut Metropolitan Council of Governments; *Mark Goetz, Connecticut Metropolitan Council of Governments

The Pequonnock River Trail is a 16 mile multi-use trail that connects Monroe, Trumbull and Bridgeport, CT. For the trail, two products were created; a static “paper” map for handouts as well as a dynamic Esri Story Map for a more in-depth view online as well as use on mobile devices. This presentation will detail the dual processes of developing two maps in two different formats designed to display the same information. The static “paper” was designed to display as much information as possible at the 8.5” X 11” size. Adobe Illustrator was utilized to create highly stylized cartography that made the map more legible as well as branded the product. We will discuss the methods we used to design and export the map in ArcGIS for easiest use in Adobe Illustrator. For the dynamic Story Map, we will discuss how, with little previous experience, we successfully configured and deployed the application. In addition, we will highlight how the Story Map was formatted to tie in with the PequonnockRiverTrail.org website as well as the static “paper” map.

Speakers
MH

Mark Hoover

Connecticut Metropolitan Council of Governments



Monday November 9, 2015 10:30am - 11:00am
Lake Champlain A

10:30am

Creating the Connecticut Maritime Heritage Corridor with Story Maps
Edward Baker, New London County Historical Society

A complete neophyte to GIS creates a new construct for understanding the historical resources of New London County (CT), the Connecticut Maritime Heritage Corridor, and creates a new web presence to share this with the public using "Story Map" templates available from ArcGIS online.

Speakers
EB

Edward Baker

New London County Historical Society



Monday November 9, 2015 10:30am - 11:00am
Montpelier A

10:30am

Modern Web Mapping for Local Governments Delivers Insights into Performance Metrics, Patterns of Change & Distribution of Resources
Kate Hickey, AppGeo

Local governments are faced with increasing citizen demands for transparency and accountability. The challenge lies in effectively distributing and presenting diverse information on the services, resources, events and decisions that are shaping the local landscape. While publicly accessible, such information is often scattered across multiple sources and disconnected web pages. This presentation will demonstrate how mapping applications can coalesce these disparate sources, providing new views and insights into performance metrics, patterns of change and distribution of resources. The results are higher engagement of residents and visitors, promotion and greater efficiency of government services, and resources for business investment and development decisions.



Monday November 9, 2015 10:30am - 11:00am
Lake Champlain B

10:30am

Setting up your ArcGIS Online Organization
Mark Scott*, Esri

Have you activated your ArcGIS Online organization yet?  Come see the next steps on setting up users, groups, roles, and other administrative tasks.

Speakers
avatar for Mark Scott

Mark Scott

Solutions Engineer, Esri
Mark Scott received a B.S. degree in Surveying Engineering at The University of Maine in 1984. He has over 7 years of practical surveying and engineering experience, and over 20 years industry experience in the technical sales and marketing of Computer Aided Design and Drafting (CAD) systems, engineering software, and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Since joining Esri, in 1997, Mark has supported the efforts of Esri account executives, Esri... Read More →



Monday November 9, 2015 10:30am - 11:00am
Green Mountain A

10:30am

Continuing to Map the Laurentian Legacy: Managing and Distributing Campus Infrastructure Data
Dakota Casserly, Carol Cady*, Shayla Witherell

At NEARC 2014, we introduced our project Mapping the Laurentian Legacy (MLL). This is a cooperative project between St. Lawrence University’s Donor Relations and GIS Programs to map the donor named spaces on campus both indoors and out. This presentation will provide an update on the project. The data are mapped with a combination of GPS, georeferenced building plans and donor records. By the end of the fall 2014 semester all outdoor locations were mapped and we had started on indoor spaces. We also began developing web map services using ArcGIS Server and Portal. We expect to develop a web mapping service for Donor Relations to manage existing sites including monitoring maintenance records, and an another service that will be available to campus visitors. While many institutions and governments are using GIS for facility management, we have not found any colleges or universities managing and distributing information about named spaces with a GIS. Because we are a small liberal-arts college with limited GIS staff, much of the work relies on student help. This project allows us to be more efficient mangers, provide students with real world GIS project experience, and give us new ways of seeing campus.

Speakers
CC

Carol Cady

St. Lawrence University
DC

Dakota Casserly

St. Lawrence University
SW

Shayla Witherell

St. Lawrence University



Monday November 9, 2015 10:30am - 11:00am
Green Mountain B

10:30am

Updating Connecticut's High-Resolution National Hydrography Dataset
Andrew Kinlock*, CLEAR; Cary Chadwick, CLEAR; Emily Wilson, CLEAR; Beth Doran, CT DEEP; Walter Tokarz, CT DEEP

The National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) is the surface water component of the National Map, a product of the United States Geological Survey (USGS). It contains features such as watersheds, lakes, ponds, reservoirs, marshes, streams, rivers, canals, dams, stream gauges, as well as other features stored in a GIS. The Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (CT DEEP) is the official data steward of the NHD for Connecticut and worked with UConn, Center for Land Use Education and Research (CLEAR) to update the dataset with funding from both USGS and CT DEEP. This talk will cover what the NHD is and how it can be used currently; it will describe specific updates that were made within Connecticut’s watersheds and also provide some insight for future updates and improvements of the NHD.

Speakers
avatar for Cary Chadwick

Cary Chadwick

UConn CLEAR
BD

Beth Doran

CT DEEP
AK

Andrew Kinlock

UConn, Center for Land Use Education and Research (CLEAR)
avatar for Emily Wilson

Emily Wilson

Geospatial Educator, University of Connecticut, CLEAR



Monday November 9, 2015 10:30am - 11:00am
VT Conference Room

10:30am

Journey to the Moving Center of the Earth - The Evolution of the National Spatial Reference System
Daniel J. Martin, Northeast Regional Geodetic Advisor, NOAA/NOS/National Geodetic Survey

In 2022, NGS will be replacing the US horizontal and vertical datums (NAD 83 and NAVD 88). This workshop is designed to discuss the need and process for these changes, as well as how these changes may affect users and what users can do to help prepare for these changes. Our journey will begin with a brief discussion of the history of the North American Datum of 1983 and the North American Vertical Datum of 1988, their relationships to other reference frames, and the reasons for their ongoing evolution. As LiDAR is becoming much more prevalent within GIS products, we will also discuss the relationships of geoid models to various versions of NAD 83, and what can happen should these relationships be ignored.

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Martin

Daniel Martin

National Geodetic Survey
Dan Martin works for the National Geodetic Survey and has been the Northeast Regional Geodetic Advisor since May of 2015. As the Regional Advisor, he instructs local surveyors, state and municipal agencies, and the geospatial community at large, on how to use and preserve the National Spatial Reference System, and provides liaison between the National Geodetic Survey and the States of ME, NH, VT, MA, CT, RI, NY, and NJ, as well as other federal... Read More →



Monday November 9, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
Green Mountain C

11:00am

The Making of a Story Map: Connecticut’s Changing Landscape
Emily Wilson*, Chet Arnold, Cary Chadwick, David Dickson

The University of Connecticut, Center for Land Use Education and Research (CLEAR) has created an award-winning story map journal. The story map guides the user through Connecticut's 25 years of land cover and land cover change. Using maps, numbers and figures, the story map explores the four land classes that have experienced the largest amounts of change: forest, agricultural field, turf & grass and developed. It also examines subsidiary analyses that further explore the impacts of land conversion over time. The talk will explore the story map itself while describing how it was created including the map services, ArcGIS Online maps, basic customization and tips and tricks learned along the way.

Speakers
CA

Chet Arnold

University of Connecticut, CLEAR
avatar for Cary Chadwick

Cary Chadwick

UConn CLEAR
DD

David Dickson

UConn Center for Land Use Education and Research
avatar for Emily Wilson

Emily Wilson

Geospatial Educator, University of Connecticut, CLEAR



Monday November 9, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
Lake Champlain A

11:00am

Re-Mapping King Philip’s War: Native Geographies in Early Colonial New England
Andy Anderson, Amherst College*; Lisa Brooks, Amherst College*

This spring Amherst College offered an experimental tutorial to introduce students to research methods in American Studies and Indigenous Studies, focusing on King Philip’s War in early colonial New England. The students read extensive background material, visited archives, and researched primary sources. A large part of the class was learning to apply GIS to help them discover the importance of spatial relationships in the origin, events, and conclusion of the War. This presentation will summarize the lessons they learned and highlight some of their results. It will also feature maps that center regional Native geographies, which may be especially useful for researchers and educators.

Speakers
avatar for Andy Anderson

Andy Anderson

Academic Technology Specialist, Amherst College
Education, history, environment, community engagement
LB

Lisa Brooks

Amherst College


Monday November 9, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
Montpelier A

11:00am

Empowering the Masses with Self Service GIS
Cary Chadwick*, University of Connecticut Center for Land use Education and Research (CLEAR) Emily Wilson, University of Connecticut Center for Land use Education and Research (CLEAR) David Dickson, University of Connecticut Center for Land use Education and Research (CLEAR)

The world of mapping is wide open. The geospatial industry is now a diverse ecosystem where professional mapping can be done in hundreds of ways including proprietary, open source, desktop, cloud-based and on mobile devices. Everything is possible and yet, despite the new trend in “simple, clean and easy” map design, no approach is arguably simple, clean or really all that easy. At CLEAR, we often produce products and trainings focused on enabling geospatial neophytes to see the power of spatial technologies and use them, often in basic ways, to support their own projects and program needs. This talk will provide examples of the challenges we have encountered as we strive to provide simple mapping solutions to the masses amid a tangled web of ever evolving spatial technology. We hope to also include an opportunity for some open discussion about the future of self service GIS.

Speakers
avatar for Cary Chadwick

Cary Chadwick

UConn CLEAR
DD

David Dickson

UConn Center for Land Use Education and Research
avatar for Emily Wilson

Emily Wilson

Geospatial Educator, University of Connecticut, CLEAR



Monday November 9, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
Lake Champlain B

11:00am

ArcGIS Open Data Jumpstart
Tom Schwartzman*, Esri

Once your ArcGIS Online organization is humming along, you may want to consider activating the Open Data application that comes along with it.  Come see how to get started with Open Data, and share your geographic information with your users, community, and the world.

Speakers


Monday November 9, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
Green Mountain A

11:00am

GIS Master Plan: From planning to implementation 12 months later
Jessica Valenti, University of Massachusetts Lowell; Peter Brigham, University of Massachusetts Lowell

A look at the development of a GIS Master Plan and what we've done over the course of the last year. In the fall of 2014 the University of Massachusetts Lowell set out to create a Facilities Information System/GIS Master Plan. A living document that would set the foundation for how we would proceed with the implementation of an enterprise GIS system. The first half of the presentation will show how we worked with our consultant, PenBay Solutions, to engage campus stakeholders, develop priorities, and, in particular, how we got buy-in and support. We will then look at where the University is now, 12 months later with respect to the identified priorities and roadmap. Sharing examples of our work with Campus Safety, Operations, Capital Projects, Parking & Transportation, Planning,and IT.

Speakers
PB

Peter Brigham

University of Massachusetts Lowell
JV

Jessica Valenti

UMass Lowell



Monday November 9, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
Green Mountain B

11:00am

Geoconflating the Rhode Island 1:5K Hydrography: Blackstone River Watershed Case Study
Alisa Morrison, URI Coastal Institute

The GeoConflation process is used to migrate attribute information from a source database to a target database in order to maintain reachcodes contained in source data. The source data, obtained from 1:24k NHD, is compared to the target data (1:5k). Where geometries match, attribution is automatically transferred. Close matches are flagged. If the feature exists in the original, but not in the target, the source feature is removed. Where the feature exists in the target but not the source, a new ReachCode is applied to the feature.The majority of the work in geoconflation done during the preprocessing stage. The end result of the process is a dataset consisting of the new geometry with reach codes and unique identifiers. All changes to the original data are tracked and the target data must pass required QA/QC checks. The objective of our project was to utilize the geoconflation process on a pilot area in Rhode Island, the Blackstone River Watershed. The 24k NHD was conflated to the local 1:5,000 hydrography database, compiled from 1997 1:5,000 orthophotography. We used LIDAR and orthoimagery to improve spatial accuracy to the maximum extent possible.

Speakers
AM

Alisa Morrison

URI Coastal Institute



Monday November 9, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
VT Conference Room

11:30am

Developing a custom story template for interpreting GIS data
Alan Hammersmith*, Stone Environmental

Come see the new story map template developed for New York State Geographic Information Gateway. It leverages intelligent use of an Enterprise Geodatabase, ArcGIS Server Feature Services, the ArcGIS JavaScript API and Google's AngularJS Framework. The layout was designed by the Office of Planning and Development using Adobe Illustrator, and using an iterative/Agile approach, further refined to incorporate multiple media types and a password protected, editing interface for use by non-developers to control the map layers and media content. By isolating the content using related tables in the geodatabase, the presentation tier can continue to be modified independently of the data model.

Speakers
AH

Alan Hammersmith

Stone Environmental



Monday November 9, 2015 11:30am - 12:00pm
Lake Champlain A

11:30am

Spatial Database Development: Teaching a Geodatabase Masters Course with a Focus on Career Development
Kate Doiron*

The intersection of education and its role in preparing students for a career is a frequently discussed topic, particularly with respect to Masters-level degrees. Building practical skills, beyond technical aspects of GIS analysis, is key to ensuring that students are prepared for more than academic work when they graduate into a field that has many other job opportunities. As a full time consultant, I developed a graduate-level Spatial Database Development course for Clark University, and taught the course for three years. The primary focus of the course is to create geodatabases in ArcGIS, and the students each undertake a final project to collect and edit GIS data, create a geodatabase schematic, generate metadata, and upload the data into their geodatabase structure. However, throughout the course the students also have to meet with advisors (“clients”), write weekly memos, complete a literature search, keep track of processes, present their findings, and write up a final report to accompany their database. In the field, all of these pieces go along with being a GIS analyst, and this course provides students with not only an idea of what consulting/governmental/NGO work will entail, but gives them a solid example of work to present in interviews.

Speakers
KD

Kate Doiron

Industrial Economics, Inc.



Monday November 9, 2015 11:30am - 12:00pm
Montpelier A

11:30am

Evolution: The Transformation of VT's GIS in the New Millennium
Steve Sharp, VT Center for Geographic Information

The State of Vermont began its investment in GIS in the late 1980's with the establishment of the Office of Geographic Information Services (OGIS). Events of the early 1990's led to the transformation of OGIS into a quasi-public non-profit corporation, the VT Center for Geographic Information Inc. (VCGI), with a statutorily defined mission charging it "with the development and implementation of a comprehensive strategy for the Vermont Geographic Information System". Over a twenty year period VCGI focused on advancing this mission through the establishment of geospatial policies, standards, and systems supported by a culture of multi-agency and multi-jurisdictional collaboration. In 2014 the VT Legislature passed legislation which transitioned VCGI back into State government. The goal of this change was to provide a higher level of stability and sustainability for the organization and its statutory mission. However, many long-term strategic questions remain. Should VCGI's mission and role be modified now that it is in State government? How should the governance of the State's GIS be re-configured? This presentation will focus on how VCGI is working with our partners to answer these questions and help the State efficiently and effectively leverage the benefits to geospatial technology.

Speakers
SS

Stephen Sharp

VT Center for Geographic Information



Monday November 9, 2015 11:30am - 12:00pm
Lake Champlain B

11:30am

Tweaking your ArcGIS Online and Open Data homepages, and settings
Tom Schwartzman*, Esri

Learn some of the many ways to configure your ArcGIS Online and Open Data pages to reflect your organization.

Speakers


Monday November 9, 2015 11:30am - 12:00pm
Green Mountain A

11:30am

Building a Public Safety GIS for Puyallup School District
* Stu Rich

School Safety is a growing concern nationally. Puyallup School District has used grant funding available from the State to implement a school safety GIS. The system included site plans and floor plans for all the district's schools and integrates with the district's automated door lock system, CCTV camera system, and scheduling system to provide staff at the district and regional security operations centers with real time information about security incidents including the ability to control individual door locks from the map interface. As an extra bonus, the district will also be using the system for room by room capacity planning.

Speakers
avatar for Stu Rich

Stu Rich

PenBay Solutions
Stuart is the Chief Technology Officer of PenBay Solutions with more than 15 years experience developing innovative geographic information systems and custom IT applications for government and non-government environmental organizations across the US and the world. He has worked extensively in the area of bringing GIS indoors including leading information modeling work and software solution design.. Stu leads the technology team responsible for... Read More →



Monday November 9, 2015 11:30am - 12:00pm
Green Mountain B

11:30am

Harmonizing the NHD and WBD Datasets in Maine
Martha G. Nielsen, USGS New England Water Science Center

In 2013, the USGS-New England Water Science Center began preparing datasets for the creation of a Maine StreamStats application. The data preparation involved using a snapshot of the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) flow line feature dataset (“NHDFlowline”) and the Watershed Boundary Dataset (WBD) and conducting a detailed QC analysis of the two datasets. Hydrologically, the NHDFlowline features should intersect with the WBD lines at very few places – only where there are legitimate inflowing tributaries for a given hydrologic accounting unit (or HUC) boundary, and only one outflow point. Using relatively simple analysis tools, errors and inconsistencies between the two datasets were located and cataloged. Using an editing environment which allowed for viewing the data in their hydrographic context (USGS topographic map DRGs overlaid on a shaded relief image of the digital elevation model) was crucial to the evaluation of potential errors in both the NHDFlowline features and the watershed boundaries. The analysis showed that both datasets (WBD and NHDFlowlines) needed correcting, because of incorrect digitizing of flowlines, improper interpretation of hydrologic connections in the NHDFlowline features, incorrect watershed boundary locations, or a combination of these. By the end of 2015, all the identified errors will be addressed and the NHD and WBD will be harmonized in Maine.

Speakers

Monday November 9, 2015 11:30am - 12:00pm
VT Conference Room

1:30pm

PlanBTV South End Land Use Inventory, Burlington, VT
Dale Abbott*, VHB Joshua Sky*, VHB

In collaboration with the City of Burlington, VT, VHB designed, implemented and deployed a mobile data collection platform for a complex land use planning inventory of the urban core of the South End of Burlington Vermont. A Land Based Classification Standards (LBCS) inventory was conducted for approximately 1,400 parcels within the South End Study Area during August of 2014. Parcels inventoried were coded in accordance with the following five dimensions of the LBCS: Activity Function Structure Site Ownership To conduct the inventory, VHB developed a custom mobile data collection application and a web mapping application interface using ArcGIS Online. The mobile data collection application was implemented using ArcGIS Collector, which allowed field staff to complete the land use inventory for each parcel in the field using their mobile phones or mobile tablet devices. This workflow provided direct access to the project GIS data while in the field, and eliminated the need for any manual data entry. Additionally, the web mapping application allowed office staff to track the progress of the inventory without leaving the office. To QA/QC the land use inventory, VHB provided the City with access to the web mapping application, which allowed the City to zoom into each parcel and check the results of the inventory. If City staff found any discrepancies in the data, they were able edit the files directly.

Speakers

Monday November 9, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Lake Champlain A

1:30pm

Innovative Regional Planning Data Sets for Transportation and Urban Planning Applications
Carl Zimmerman*, Ph.D., Westcog

Regional and metropolitan planning agencies have traditionally used decennial data sets from the U.S. Census Bureau, traffic counts, and single-car GPS to understand and facilitate transportation and urban planning research. These data sets, while extremely useful and widely disseminated, are comparatively coarse. Inadequate spatial and temporal resolutions limit modeling, map creation, and analysis. In this presentation, attendees will learn about several innovative data sets including the National Performance Management Research Data Set (NPMRDS) vehicle speed data, Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics (LODES) employment data sets, and social media feeds that allow for innovative modeling. A brief case study will demonstrate how to process and analyze the very large NPMRDS data sets.

Speakers
CZ

Carl Zimmerman PhD

WestCOG (Western CT Council of Governments)



Monday November 9, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Montpelier A

1:30pm

Smart Mapping with ArcGIS Online for Non-Mappers
Tom Schwartzman*, Esri

With every release of ArcGIS Online, new features are added to bring the power of Web GIS to more and more users in your organization.  Smart Mapping, new interfaces, and more intuitive tools will help guide new users along the way. 

Speakers


Monday November 9, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Green Mountain A

1:30pm

The Development of NY CRIS Trekker – A mobile survey solution for capturing historic buildings for an enterprise geodatabase
Larry Spraker of Fountains Spatial, Inc.

The NY Cultural Resource Information System (CRIS) is a spatially enabled enterprise system used by the NY State Historic Preservation Office (NYSHPO) for managing the historic resources of New York State. CRIS was deployed in 2014 and has increased the productivity of NYSHPO dramatically. CRIS Trekker is a new module recently developed that allows users to perform field-based data collection on individual buildings, including the capture of photographs and a locational coordinate (via GPS or manual placement) using hand-held devices such as a tablet or smartphone. The building surveys are uploaded (synced) to a centralized server for download, review and processing by SHPO staff. The building surveys are ultimately used by SHPO to create new buildings, or update existing buildings in the CRIS database. CRIS Trekker leverages the Trimble Terra Flex product as the mobile application for deploying a custom building survey form for data collection. This presentation will discuss the architecture, security and challenges associated with integrating Trimble TerraFlex with ArcGIS Server and an Enterprise geodatabase to support CRIS.

Speakers
LS

Larry Spraker

Fountains Spatial



Monday November 9, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Green Mountain C

1:30pm

Street Light Management, the 100% ArcGIS online Method
Eric Pescatore, Martha Ziemer

Communities around the country are experiencing huge cost savings in street lighting through conversion to LED lighting. Often the first step a community will take would be an audit of its existing inventory, which leads into an installation phase to replace the fixtures. This leads to specific challenges in each phase of the project. For example, when issues are encountered and need to be the client in a timely manner or maintaining access to specific data-sets for a variety of stakeholders.  This talk will focus on the use of a 100% ArcGIS Online solution to manage all phases of a LED retro-fit project for New Bedford, MA and cover the lessons learned.  This project utilized Collector for the inventory process, Operations Dashboard for issue and KPI tracking, and ArcGIS Online web applications to support community outreach.

Speakers


Monday November 9, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Green Mountain B

1:30pm

Preparing LiDAR for ArcGIS Using the Point Data Abstraction Library (PDAL)
Roland Duhaime, University of Rhode Island

Over the past 10 years we have seen a large increase in the amount of LIDAR data available in the Northeast.  These data are often provided in the form of LAS files.  In this presentation I will introduce the Point Data Abstraction Library (PDAL).  I will discuss how this library can be used for merging and clipping LAS files.  I will also demonstrate how to colorize LAS files from associated aerial photography as either true color or false color infrared.  I will then display these colorized LAS files as LAS Datasets using ArcScene in ArcGIS.  In conclusion, I will highlight additional functionality of PDAL and how to create a clip polygon in the required format.

Speakers
avatar for Roland Duhaime

Roland Duhaime

Research Associate IV, University of Rhode Island
If you are not familiar with "LAS Datasets", it would be great if you could watch this training video before attending my NEARC session (Not required): | | https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G8IC6dD5L-A | | Thanks, | Roland



Monday November 9, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Lake Champlain B

1:30pm

Producing High Resolution NHDPlus for Maine
Richard Moore, Martha Nielsen, and Craig Johnston; USGS New England Water Science Center

Maine and parts of New Hampshire have served as a pilot for the production of High Resolution National Hydrography Dataset Plus (HRNHDPlus). This occurred in several steps.
The first step resulted from the development of a StreamStats application—a tool to estimate streamflow statistics at any point along the stream network. The State of Maine initiated a state-wide StreamStats web application. This project took advantage of the NHDPlus version 2 software that creates catchments and flow direction grids to be used as input to StreamStats. NHDPlus version 2 production software, developed for the medium resolution NHDPlus (1:100,000-scale) and run for the contiguous United Sates, was subsequently run using the high resolution NHD (1:25,000-scale) for the State of Maine and for the portions of New Hampshire that drain into Maine.
Second, errors in the NHD and WBD that were found during this process were fixed and the corrections incorporated into the national databases. This step will be covered in the presentation preceding this presentation.
Third, the improved data for Maine were used as a pilot for national production of HRNHDPlus using newly developed HRNHDPlus software and a new national HRNHDPlus data model.

Speakers
CJ

Craig Johnston

USGS New England Water Science Center


Monday November 9, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm
VT Conference Room

2:00pm

Leveraging ArcGIS Online on MassDOT Conditional Asset Management Inventory
Amy Haas*, VHB Heather Fuller, VHB

VHB conducted a conditional asset management inventory for 8.5 miles of roadway along Revere Beach Parkway which will be transferred to the MassDOT state highway system. Esri’s ArcGIS Online and the Collector application were used to collect data on the existing infrastructure including guardrail, lighting, pavement markings, lane use, sidewalks, curbing, landscaping, and drainage features. In place of preparing and relying on hard copy maps to take in the field and collect hand-written notes for all of the features, ArcGIS Online and the Collector app were used in conjunction with each other to complete the data collection in-house and in the field saving time and money all while eliminating transcription errors ultimately producing a consistent data product that is seamlessly integrated into the GIS database for analysis, reporting, mapping and management. The Operations Dashboard was instrumental in providing Project Managers access to the data collection progress, monitor attributes for compliance and to provide support to field teams in real-time. The presentation will describe the project, discuss the benefits and advantages of the chosen approach and demonstrate the applications used.

Speakers

Monday November 9, 2015 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Lake Champlain A

2:00pm

Trials and tribulations of launching Portal with a Federated Hosting Server on Amazon EC2
* Joshua Persson

Thinking of launching ArcGIS Portal with a Federated Hosting Server on Amazon EC2? While not an expert by all means, I will walk through my experiences and offer some tips and guidance for those looking to foray into the Amazon Cloud,

Speakers

Monday November 9, 2015 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Montpelier A

2:00pm

ArcGIS Online Best Practices
Tom Schwartzman*, Esri

Learn some basic guidelines on organizing, tweaking, and managing your ArcGIS Online organization, integrate it with your ArcGIS for Server investment, and some tips and tricks on creating content from ArcGIS for Desktop.

Speakers


Monday November 9, 2015 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Green Mountain A

2:00pm

Two Web Applications Addressing Climate Change and Community Resilience
Katie Budreski, Stone Environmental

Stone Environmental will demonstrate two web applications developed in response to President Obama's Climate Data Initiative thru Esri's Climate Resilience App Challenge and the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR) Making Cities Resilient Campaign thru Esri Global Disaster Resilience App Challenge 2014 The Modeling Community Erosion from Climate Change App enables community members and leaders to understand the impact climate change will have on soil erosion. It provides a basis for taking preventative action regarding infrastructure investments and soil conservation using high-resolution scientific data. The Modeling Resilience to Stormwater During Extreme Events App supports the preparation of risk assessments as a basis for urban development plans and decisions by highlighting critical areas of accumulation of runoff during extreme weather that may be in excess of the runoff volume for which infrastructure was designed. Predictions of excess stormwater over land and historic flood zones are overlaid with infrastructure such as bridges, culverts, catchbasins, storm drains and storm lines to help identify system risks. Risk information in the app can help prioritize investment and maintenance of critical stormwater infrastructure.

Speakers
avatar for Katie Budreski

Katie Budreski

Senior GIS Specialist, Stone Environmental
GIS Analysis, Renewable Energy, Coastal Planning, Raster Analysis, Application Development



Monday November 9, 2015 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Green Mountain C

2:00pm

A Semi-automated GIS Method and Toolkit for Mapping Stormwater Outfall Catchment Areas
Eliza Wallace, PhD, Metropolitan Area Planning Council Timothy Reardon, Metropolitan Area Planning Council Sarah Bounty, Neponset River Watershed Association

In order to comply with the federal Clean Water Act, many municipalities throughout New England are or will soon be required to map catchment areas that contribute stormwater to each outfall owned and operated by the municipal storm sewer system. System operators are further required to analyze polluting land uses and the potential for illicit discharge within each catchment area, and the water quality of receiving waters, in order to prioritize pollution reduction efforts. To reduce redundancy of effort and account for the varied data resources available in different municipalities, the Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC), in partnership with the Neponset River Watershed Association, developed a regionally applicable method to conduct this analysis requiring a bare minimum of local stormwater infrastructure data in a standardized format. This basic process for this method is to 1) modify publicly available high resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) to be more hydrologically accurate, 2) use the DEMs to calculate small watersheds for each catch basin, and 3) merge the catch basin watersheds by outfall. MAPC created and published a set of ArcGIS tools available as a free download to municipalities and their contractors to help automate this process to promote a simple and cost effective method to determine outfall catchment areas.

Speakers
SB

Sarah Bounty

Neponset River Watershed Association
TR

Timothy Reardon

Metropolitan Area Planning Council



Monday November 9, 2015 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Green Mountain B

2:00pm

UAV and GIS Support for Project Management
Steven Santovasi, GISP

Burns & McDonnell has introduced Drone Technology to help streamline multiple workflows and reduce costs for monitoring and data gathering. The introduction of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) is a cost effective method to effectively create project base mapping, monitor construction status, safety, compliance, equipment and labor, schedule and ultimately: cost. The incorporation of this information into cost management and project controls workflows affords the ability to more accurately document status and progress as well as predict and project schedule, procurement and invoicing. This new technology in conjunction with mobile field data collection, high accuracy ground control, and a GIS project dashboard create a full transparent view of a project at any given point. From the planning stages, to permitting, construction, as-built, and operations and maintenance; UAV’s and GIS support are playing an ever increasing role in large scale projects and how cost engineering is impacted.

Speakers
SS

Steven Santovasi

Burns & McDonnell


Monday November 9, 2015 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Lake Champlain B

2:00pm

National Hydrography Dataset Analysis in StreamStats
Pete Steeves, GIS Specialist- USGS

StreamStats (http://streamstats.usgs.gov) is a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Web-based geographic information systems application developed as a tool for water-resources planning and management, engineering design, and numerous other applications. For several years, StreamStats has showcased some of the more advanced capabilities of the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) in Version 2, including a variety of tools related to tracing the stream network upstream and downstream to search for and query “point events” (important point locations on the network), such as water quality measurement locations, dams, and gages. Several of these tools were needed for specific StreamStats analyses, such as the tool to Estimate Flows Based on Similar Streamgaging Stations. Other tools within StreamStats (Version 2) showcase additional NHD network navigation functionality, which helps to educate StreamStats users about how the NHD can be utilized for hydrologic analysis. Recently, StreamStats was upgraded to a new version (3). This upgrade, and subsequent upgrades, will allow these tools to be explored and expanded upon further. This presentation will discuss the long-time NHD tool functionality in StreamStats, the upgrading of these tools, and plans moving forward.

Speakers
avatar for Pete Steeves

Pete Steeves

GIS Specialist, USGS
Pete Steeves has been with the USGS since 1988.  He is a long-standing member (and past President) of the Northeast Arc Users Group (NEARC).  Pete works with several major national programs, including StreamStats and the National Hydrography Dataset.  He also is part of an international joint task force between the USA and Canada, whose objectives are to "harmonize" physiographic geospatial datasets along the shared border.  



Monday November 9, 2015 2:00pm - 2:30pm
VT Conference Room

2:30pm

Paving Cut Management using ArcGIS Online
Jim Wysor, The Metropolitan District

The Metropolitan District Commission (MDC) is a regional water and sewer company that maintains 1,365 miles of sanitary sewer mains and 1,578 miles of water mains. With this much infrastructure, it is inevitable that repairs will be needed. When a repair occurs, the street and/or a sidewalk needs to be cut so crews can access the pipe or fitting. The cut can be an inconvenience and an eye sore for a property owner as well as make for a less than smooth driving experience on roads. With repairs constantly being made, there are a large number of paving cuts that must be tracked and managed. The MDC is using ArcGIS Online to manage this work. Prior to this, paving cuts were managed by hand using paper forms and maps that resulted in cuts being forgotten, difficulties tracking work progress and a tedious and time consuming management process. By embracing ArcGIS Online, the MDC can now track the progress of paving cut work in near real time, allow contractors to update their schedule in a timely fashion and allow others in the organization to view the status of any paving cut at any time leading to better customer service.

Speakers
JW

Jim Wysor

Metropolitan District Commission


Monday November 9, 2015 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Lake Champlain A

2:30pm

From Idea to Reality: Lessons Learned from the Creation of Statewide ROW Data
Nina Safavi, VT Agency of Transportation Andy Buck, Applied Geographics, Inc.

The AASHTO Innovation Initiative team shares the lessons learned from the Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTrans) Right-of-Way data modernization effort and makes key recommendations for any Department of Transportation (DOT) or other agency contemplating a large scale data modernization effort. In 2012, VTrans started to consolidate existing information - historic surveys, hand drawn construction designs, and CADD drawing files - to create a statewide ROW GIS document management system. The goal was to make ROW data accessible and usable to key business functions such as property management, roadway design, and utility placement. To get started, a pilot project for data inventory and transformation, including all available ROW data source types, was undertaken and a Return on Investment (ROI) study was completed. Today, VTrans has compiled authoritative data and generated geospatial ROW layer for over 87% of Vermont’s 2707 state highway miles. VTrans has defined a workflow that includes identification of best available project source data, drawing georeferencing and digitization or CADD conversion, and aggregation into route-based ROW polygons. Through this process, VTrans has created an highly valuable resource and learned many valuable lessons about managing the ROW data lifecycle (research, identify, catalog, collect, update, convert, and publish).

Speakers
AB

Andy Buck

Applied Geographics, Inc.
NS

Nina Safavi

VT Agency of Transportation



Monday November 9, 2015 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Montpelier A

2:30pm

Getting Started with Esri Maps for Office
Mark Scott*, Esri

See how Esri Maps for Office ties your ArcGIS Online Organization with Microsoft Office apps like Excel and PowerPoint.

Speakers
avatar for Mark Scott

Mark Scott

Solutions Engineer, Esri
Mark Scott received a B.S. degree in Surveying Engineering at The University of Maine in 1984. He has over 7 years of practical surveying and engineering experience, and over 20 years industry experience in the technical sales and marketing of Computer Aided Design and Drafting (CAD) systems, engineering software, and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Since joining Esri, in 1997, Mark has supported the efforts of Esri account executives, Esri... Read More →



Monday November 9, 2015 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Green Mountain A

2:30pm

OntheMap: Local Employment Dynamics
Alexandra Barker

Learn to access data about local workforce and employment trends, including commuting patterns, industry, and workers characteristics. This tool allows you to analyze areas where workers live or where workers are employed.

During this overview of the OntheMap tool you will also learn how to upload shapefiles and download the datasets.  

Speakers

Monday November 9, 2015 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Green Mountain C

2:30pm

Using Municiple Infrastructure Data to Plan Reconstruction Projects
*Jonnell Robinson and Kelsey May

This presentation will show how GIS was used to visualize and predict areas for water main break repair and road reconstruction in Syracuse, New York.

Speakers
KM

Kelsey May

Syracuse University
JR

Jonnell Robinson

Syracuse University



Monday November 9, 2015 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Green Mountain B

2:30pm

UAS for your GIS
Jarlath O'Neil-Dunne*, University of Vermont

A new generation of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) have arrived. These UAS are small, lightweight, easily deployable, and have the capability to quickly and easily map small areas, producing GIS-ready orthorectified imagery and 3D point clouds in a matter of hours. This workshop will dive into these “mapping grade” UAS, discuss their capabilities and limitations, and examine dozens of different case studies in which they have been used. Get ready to learn how to make the most of UAS for your GIS.

Speakers
JO

Jarlath O'Neil-Dunne

University of Vermont


Monday November 9, 2015 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Lake Champlain B

2:30pm

USGS Hydrography Requirements and Benefits Study (HRBS) - An Overview of Results from New England
Dan Walters, National Map Liaison for Massachusetts, Maine and Rhode Island

The USGS National Geospatial Program, the USGS Office of Water Information, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service have begun a study to identify and understand user requirements, and the associated benefits, for improved hydrographic data. An online questionnaire was provided to 33 Federal agencies and representative users in all 50 States including State, local, and tribal governments, non-profits, academia, and the private sector. In the initial response, these users identified 595 Mission Critical Activities that benefited from hydrographic data, including applications ranging from water-quality monitoring to real estate, and from rangeland management to urban planning. This presentation will review HRBS and present preliminary results for New Engand.

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Walters

Daniel Walters

National Map Liaison, USGS
3DEP, NHD, Penn State football and UMaine hockey



Monday November 9, 2015 2:30pm - 3:00pm
VT Conference Room
 
Tuesday, November 10
 

10:30am

Introducing Spatial Mapping in Non-GIS Classes
Paula Kay Lazrus, St John's University

Traditionally GIS at the university level is taught in classes dedicated to the topic, or within disciplines that are intensive users of the technology. Inserting basic mapping and analytical skills in general education classes may seem a daunting proposition to many faculty members and yet, with the new ArcGIS Online capabilities it has never been easier to introduce students to GIS. Faculty in any discipline will find simple and straightforward tools that can be used in a wide range of classes and that are available without an institutional account. This can provide a gateway to exploring the spatial aspects inherent in the content of many disciplines. Concerns about a GIS learning curve are alleviated when using the basic online tools available and it is easy to train colleagues and students to become proficient enough to explore and create maps in a short time. A short module introducing students to ArcGIS online basics can lead to exploring the spatial or analytical patterns in literary or historical texts or simple data sets and the production of simple but interesting maps and storymaps. This presentation will examine some of the ways you might assist non GIS proficient colleagues in incorporating GIS in a non GIS class.

Speakers
PK

Paula Kay Lazrus

St John's University



Tuesday November 10, 2015 10:30am - 11:00am
Lake Champlain A

10:30am

Cool, Cheap, & Easy Mobile Mapping Tools
David Dickson*, UConn Extension & CLEAR & Cary Chadwick*, UConn Extension & CLEAR

There are, of course, apps for everything and then some – including mapping. However they vary greatly in terms of function, feature, cost and usefulness. This session will highlight mapping apps that are cool, cheap, simple, and very useful. Armed with these apps and a mobile device anyone with little money and/or geospatial skill can (1) digitize any paper map, (2) collect tracks and waypoint data, and (3) create custom forms for mobile data collection. Where possible, will also include information on integrating with your GIS workflow.

Speakers
avatar for Cary Chadwick

Cary Chadwick

UConn CLEAR
DD

David Dickson

UConn Center for Land Use Education and Research


Tuesday November 10, 2015 10:30am - 11:00am
Green Mountain C

10:30am

Your first project using ArcGIS Pro
Patrick Gahagan*, Esri

ArcGIS Pro is a new application for the ArcGIS Desktop user.  Using a 64 bit design, faster graphics library, and a ribbon-based toolbar, it is the next generation of ArcGIS for Desktop.

Speakers

Tuesday November 10, 2015 10:30am - 11:00am
Green Mountain A

10:30am

An analysis of forest composition and growth using dendrochronology and historical air photos
William Hansen*, Amanda Amory

Over the past 200 years the New England landscape has experienced profound changes resulting from settlement, forest clearing for farming and reforestation. This large-scale forest regeneration offers researchers a unique opportunity to examine, in fine detail, shifts in vegetation species composition, growth rates and morphologic structural changes. Forests in Central Massachusetts were studied using historical air photos, field vegetation surveys, dendrochronology samping and Geographic Information System data. 45 plots were surveyed and analyzed for variation in forest regeneration and species abundance. Results were compared to historical surveys conducted by Harvard Forest researchers on colonial witness trees. The analysis showed a decrease in species diversity but increase in growth rates over the 20th century.

Speakers
AA

Amanda Amory

Worcester State University
WH

William Hansen

Worcester State University



Tuesday November 10, 2015 10:30am - 11:00am
Green Mountain B

10:30am

Risk Modeling for Energy and Communications Infrastructure
Jamie Gaynor* (Terracon), Jason Wise (Terracon)

The political and regulatory landscape surrounding infrastructure projects is often dynamic and unruly, yet the natural landscape that influences project feasibility and asset integrity is somewhat predictable. As consultants in the AEC industry, we must frequently negotiate both of these systems. Here we will discuss the availability and limitations of public and proprietary data for modeling natural systems including the National Elevation Dataset, the NRCS STATSGO/SSURGO soil datasets, the National Hydrography dataset, and more. We will also present several examples of risk-based raster models developed to help guide project planning and protect infrastructure assets. Topics of discussion will include raster model workflows, technical development, and web-based tools/applications.

Speakers


Tuesday November 10, 2015 10:30am - 11:00am
VT Conference Room

10:30am

GIS in Vermont 25 Years Ago
Gary Smith; Johnathan Croft, VTrans; Sara Moulton, VTrans; Steve Bower

We will discuss what GIS looked like in Vermont 25 years ago. Who used GIS? What data was available? What was the software like? How did we go from having no GIS in Vermont to the establishment of the Office of GIS? We will address these questions, plus many others.

Speakers
SM

Sara Moulton

Vermont Agency of Transportation



Tuesday November 10, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
Montpelier A

10:30am

Using LiDAR Data to Create 3D Building Footprints
Katrina Schweikert

More and more GIS professionals are utilizing LiDAR data to leverage the third dimension in their GIS projects. The increased availability of these LiDAR point clouds, combined with the development of powerful software to efficiently and effectively utilize this data, have provided the means for GIS professionals to create 3D data layers that were virtually unheard of a few years ago. Beyond simply generating crude surface models, these software tools significantly improve the usability of the data through the elimination of erroneous points and the automatic reclassification of the point cloud to reflect the actual characteristics of the mapped surface. In this workshop we will use LiDAR processing tools to create a 3D building footprint layer. Among the procedures employed in this workflow are classification tools that are designed to automatically detect and reclassify ground points, buildings, and vegetation in unclassified data. In this presentation, we will also demonstrate how LiDAR data can be queried; filtered, and edited to create a more usable point cloud layer. Finally we will demonstrate how to automatically extract and delineate vector features, including buildings, from classified LiDAR points.



Tuesday November 10, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
Lake Champlain B

11:00am

Mobile and Online Solutions for Bridge Inspection, Management and Maintenance
Amy Haas*, Josh Cone-Roddy* – VHB

VHB is working with the City of Worcester, MA Department of Public Works to develop a GIS database to monitor the condition of their bridge assets and to create a bridge asset management plan.  A geodatabase was created to store several various bridge point layers.  It was built out using Esri’s Local Government Information Model (LGIM) and supplemented with the MassDOT Inspection Report fields.  Various web applications were created in ArcGIS Online to allow the end users to quickly view, chart, edit and query the bridge attributes to review the condition of the bridges and categorize bridges with structural deficiencies.  Ultimately, it will be used in conjunction with the bridge asset management plan to prioritize funding for repairs and coordinate maintenance of their critical infrastructure.  The presentation will describe the project, discuss the benefits and advantages of the chosen approach, and demonstrate the applications used.


Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
Lake Champlain A

11:00am

CANCELLED: Developing & Implementing a Sidewalk Inventory and Inspection Program using Collector for ArcGIS
Justin Jobin, GIS Coordinator for The Town of Jamestown, RI

To any city or town sidewalks pose a large threat. Trips and falls on public sidewalks represent a large percentage of most towns insurance claims. The Town of Jamestown RI set out to inventory and assess the condition of all sidewalks in Town. We wanted to use an in-house cradle to crave approach. After a lengthy brainstorming sessions we decided upon a two part approach. First, we would inventory sidewalk segments in the Town, using our Trimble Geo7 we collected basic attributes for each sidewalk segment. Attributes collected included: length, width, to and from points, street name and side of street, and surface and curb typed. Secondly, a separate geodatabase was created with the sidewalk inspection criteria. This geodatabase was published as a service to the Town’s ArcGIS Online. Using an iPad with Collector for ArcGIS installed, staff went out and completed inspections of all the previously identified sidewalk segments. The geodatabase was then pulled back into ArcMap where we mapped the sidewalk conditions and completed a final report that includes replacement strategy and costs.

Speakers
avatar for Justin Jobin

Justin Jobin

GIS Coordinator, The Town of Jamestown
Justin Jobin is the Environmental Scientist and GIS Coordinator for the Town of Jamestown, RI where he is responsible for the implementation, management, and maintenance of The Town's  Geographic Information System.  He is also responsible for overseeing the Town’s High Groundwater and Impervious Soils Ordinance, The Onsite Wastewater Management Program and RIPDES Phase II Stormwater Program.  He graduated from The University... Read More →


Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
Green Mountain C

11:00am

Reasons you need Tasks in ArcGIS Pro
Mark Scott*, Esri

Tasks area great capability of ArcGIS Pro that allow you to chain together steps into a packaged workflow.  They can then be used as a tool to maintain a standard workflow, or help a user new to a certain job.

Speakers
avatar for Mark Scott

Mark Scott

Solutions Engineer, Esri
Mark Scott received a B.S. degree in Surveying Engineering at The University of Maine in 1984. He has over 7 years of practical surveying and engineering experience, and over 20 years industry experience in the technical sales and marketing of Computer Aided Design and Drafting (CAD) systems, engineering software, and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Since joining Esri, in 1997, Mark has supported the efforts of Esri account executives, Esri... Read More →



Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
Green Mountain A

11:00am

Conservation Planning Using a Spatially Explicit Decision Support Framework for Climate Adaptation
David Richardson*, The Nature Conservancy (TNC); Becky Shirer, TNC; Kristin France, TNC; Stevie Adams, TNC; and Chris Zimmerman, TNC.

The Nature Conservancy in New York is producing a decision support tool, named the Natural Resource Navigator, to help natural resource managers identify appropriate adaptation strategies. While both written guidances on how to adapt conservation practice to climate change and an array of datasets that could inform adaptation planning currently exist, practitioners have struggled to implement these largely generic recommendations and integrate disparate datasets to inform decisions. This tool addresses these challenges and facilitates the development of actionable site-specific strategies. By synthesizing spatial data on natural resource conditions, non-climate threats, and climate change exposure and sensitivity, the tool provides a structured process for managers to use data to select the most appropriate climate adaptation options for their particular area or target. In addition, the complete toolkit will provide resources for implementing the chosen adaptation action and high quality exports, including maps and documentation of the decision process. While the tool’s underlying data focuses on NY, the framework could be adapted for other locations. We will demonstrate how the tool can be applied to various types of adaptation projects, highlighting several freshwater and terrestrial case studies.


Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
Green Mountain B

11:00am

GIS and The Vermont Energy Scene
Josh Sky, VHB; Jesse Therrien, VHB; Alexis Coplin, VHB

Development of energy projects in Vermont is surging. Check out the news or take a drive around the state and you’ll see the evidence: new solar farms, wind turbines, manure digesters, wind turbines, electric transmission upgrades, and natural gas pipeline expansions. This presentation will cover the many ways in which GIS technology is being used to facilitate the efficient development of energy projects, including project site selection and screening, site assessment, project data management, project permitting, and permit compliance. Three examples of how GIS has been used through the project lifecycle will be presented: the selection and development of a 1.5 MW solar farm project, a 63 MW wind farm project, and a natural gas pipeline expansion. The presentation will demonstrate how the scalability and manifold capability of GIS offered distinct strategic advantages for each of these projects and was a key ingredient for their success.


Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
VT Conference Room

11:30am

In with the old, out with the new
*Mark Hoover, Connecticut Metropolitan Council of Governments; *George Obeng, Connecticut Metropolitan Council of Governments

As an organization that focuses on regional transportation, the Connecticut Metropolitan Council of Governments has a long history of dealing with cumbersome transportation products. Whether produced at the local, state or federal level, these products can often be poorly organized and confusing to work with. This year we took a look at our internal transportation data and began incorporating some products in ArcGIS. In particular, this presentation will describe the conversion of a Traffic Signal Evaluation and Management Study from the early 2000’s from its custom Access 97 database to a file geodatabase that is now user friendly but can be used with ArcGIS Collector for in-field inspections. In addition, we will showcase how we converted and transformed various state and federal transportation mapping products into easier to use GIS data.

Speakers
MH

Mark Hoover

Connecticut Metropolitan Council of Governments
GO

George Obeng

Connecticut Metropolitan Council of Governments


Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:30am - 12:00pm
Lake Champlain A

11:30am

ArcGIS Server for Field Data Collection in the City of Concord
*Ying Zhou

City of Concord completed utility and street infrastructure mapping years ago. New construction and repair work records are updated as soon as plans and field books are submitted. Sewer and water system record cards are digitally managed and linked to GIS. Whether in the office or on a job site, users can access utility records through an ArcGIS Server web app, a desktop ArcGIS app, or an ArcReader document. Each water, sewer, or highway field crew is equipped with an iPad or a laptop. We expanded our field GIS use into maintenance data collection on iPads. Data being collected include maintenance records of hydrant flushing, valve inspection, pavement marking painting, storm water catch basin cleaning, and sewer/drain main maintenance activities. The data collection apps are built on ArcGIS API for JavaScript. Since data layers are served from an ArcSDE geodatabase, supervisors in the office can see new records as soon as they are saved. Maintenance records are stored in stand-alone SDE tables linked to the feature layers by one-to-many relationship classes. Managers are now able to print weekly, monthly, or annual work progress reports directly from the web apps.

Speakers
YZ

Ying Zhou

City of Concord


Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:30am - 12:00pm
Green Mountain C

11:30am

3D Visualization with ArcGIS Pro and City Engine
Patrick Gahagan*, Esri

ArcGIS Pro integrates 2D and 3D data into Maps, Scenes, and Globes, seamlessly.  City Engine allows you to build a realistic 3D model of your city.  See how it is done, and how it works.

Speakers

Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:30am - 12:00pm
Green Mountain A

11:30am

The Ancient Woodlands of Martha's Vineyard, MA
Brian Hall*, David Foster, and David Orwig, Harvard Forest

Ancient woodlands (AW) are forests that exist on sites that have been continuously forested and though harvested, have not been cleared or used for intensive farming. In practice, they are defined as woodlands that have remained forested for hundreds of years, or are shown as wooded on an area’s oldest high-quality maps. While they may, or may not contain old trees, AW are important because they often have different vegetation structure, composition, and soil characteristics than secondary forests which have regrown on previously cleared sites. As part of a multifaceted study on the nature and vegetation of Martha’s Vineyard, we conducted a GIS-based overlay analysis with maps from the 1850s and 1890s, 1938 aerial photos, and modern vegetation layers to identify potential AW sites. Field plots were established across the 95-square-mile island in a variety of forest types to describe the vegetation, verify AW status, and compare tree age and size structure to nearby secondary forests. We will discuss our findings regarding the variation in age structure across different forest types and land-use histories and address broader issues such as: why older forests can be important for biodiversity, concerns with using old maps to define AW, and field evidence that can be used to identify older forests.

Speakers
DF

David Foster

Harvard Forest
BH

Brian Hall

Harvard Forest/University
DO

David Orwig

Harvard Forest


Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:30am - 12:00pm
Green Mountain B

11:30am

Eversource Parcel Mapping Initiative
Dale Abbott*, VHB Steven Anderson*, VHB

Within the State of New Hampshire, Eversource holds fee to hundreds of parcels, comprising thousands of acres throughout the State. To serve its business needs it has become necessary to map and retain data for each parcel to be used as a land management tool. Under contract to Eversource, VHB developed a GIS based, parcel inventory for approximately 900 Fee-owned parcels held by Eversource. Eversource maintains real estate records for all of their Fee-owned parcels, but prior to the project, did not maintain any spatial information (CAD/GIS mapping) associated with each property. The project team identified the New Hampshire’s Parcel Mosaic Database (Parcel Mosaic), which was recently released by the New Hampshire Department of Revenue Administration as a public dataset, as the primary source for the missing spatial information. VHB validated and cleaned the real estate database to link the database to the Parcel Mosaic. The majority of the real estate listing linked to the Parcel Mosaic. For the remaining properties, VHB acquired hardcopy tax maps and digitized the boundaries, yielding a complete Fee-owned parcel layer. With parcel boundaries established and linked to the real estate database, the project team enhanced the database by collecting tax property cards for each parcel. Key attributes, such as the legal reference (County Book & Page), Map/Lot, Land Use Description, Assessed Land Area, Etc., were extracted from the property cards. In addition, a physical copy of the card was hyperlinked to the digital parcel layer, as well as a direct web link to the property card for those communities with online assessing records. In addition to producing a File Geodatabase to house the inventory and desktop GIS mapping, VHB generated an ArcGIS Online web mapping application to track and collect the property cards as well as extending access of the data to non-GIS users, such as staff from the Eversource’s Real Estate group.


Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:30am - 12:00pm
VT Conference Room

1:30pm

Public Health GIS Cluster Analysis Methods
Barbara Carroll, VT Department of Health; Pete Young, VT Department of Health; Emma Gause, VT Department of Health; Moshe Braner, VT Department of Health

One of the fundamental goals of spatial analysis is to determine whether an event takes place at differential rates in different locations. Cluster analysis, or “Hot Spot” detection, takes this analysis one step further by identifying areas of statistically significant clusters of either high or low rates. The key phrase here is statistically significant. The importance of finding such significant high or low rates cannot be overlooked, and thus GIS users at the Vermont Department of Health are implementing this strategy of analysis to identify areas of Vermont with particularly heavy health burdens. However, there are numerous different methods for evaluating clusters, and thus the statistical significance of the various outputs can be controversial. To illustrate the pros and cons, necessary data preparation, and potential pitfalls of conducting this type of analysis, the presenters will explore two common hot spot analysis methods: ArcMap’s False Discovery Rate (FDR) Optimized Hotspot Analysis & SaTScan’s Cluster Analysis. Case studies will be presented concerning health outcomes and incidence rates. However, cluster analysis is applicable for a variety of spatial data domains.

Speakers
MB

Moshe Braner

VT Department of Health
BC

Barbara Carroll

Vermont Department of Health
EG

Emma Gause

VT Department of Health
PY

Pete Young

VT Department of Health



Tuesday November 10, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Green Mountain C

1:30pm

Reconstructing Paleoindian Settlement, Travel and the Cognitive Landscape within the Champlain Valley of Vermont
Jess Robinson, John G. Crock, and Wetherbee B. Dorshow - State of Vermont, Division for Historic Preservation

This paper examines least-cost pathways between the locations of recorded Paleoindian sites in and near the Champlain Valley of Vermont and the source locations of selected lithic raw materials to contextualize population movement and interaction throughout the Paleoindian periods. Settlement patterns and possible travel routes are also reconstructed to investigate Native American adaptations to the Late Pleistocene landscape of the of the Champlain Valley far Northeast.


Tuesday November 10, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Montpelier A

1:30pm

A Beginner's Guide to Web App Builder
Mark Scott*, Esri

Take your web map to the next level with Web App Builder, and have a powerful, custom GIS app that will run on any device using JavaScript and HTML5.  Best thing: No Coding Required (unless you want to).

Speakers
avatar for Mark Scott

Mark Scott

Solutions Engineer, Esri
Mark Scott received a B.S. degree in Surveying Engineering at The University of Maine in 1984. He has over 7 years of practical surveying and engineering experience, and over 20 years industry experience in the technical sales and marketing of Computer Aided Design and Drafting (CAD) systems, engineering software, and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Since joining Esri, in 1997, Mark has supported the efforts of Esri account executives, Esri... Read More →



Tuesday November 10, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Green Mountain A

1:30pm

Moving through space and time: How images from the past can inform decisions about the future
Wilfred Mercier, Sewall

As the geospatial community has been buzzing about 3D analysis for the past decade, another form of enhanced analysis has flown under the radar: analysis in the fourth dimension, time. Advances in computing, increased access to large historical data archives, and the introduction of sensors with rapid revisitation cycles have all helped open the door for analysis that not only asks the question of where, but also when. Time series analysis of historical data can provide a clearer picture of current conditions, and rapid data collection rates allow us to watch and react to business-changing events, like severe insect outbreaks, as they unfold. Old data is now answering new questions while new data is answering old questions. The science of converting large volumes of data into actionable intelligence has been growing, allowing us to leverage the new world of big data with fascinating results. In this presentation, we look at some of the data and technologies that are allowing these advances to take place, and provide some examples of how these advances are being applied to answer real world questions.

Speakers

Tuesday November 10, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Green Mountain B

1:30pm

Mt. Washington Avalanche Center's Daily Advisory and the National Avalanche Map
Jonathan Hall*

This volunteer project, in its 2nd year for the US Forest Service (Androscoggin District, White Mtn Nat'l Forest, Gorham, NH), started as an Avalanche Path Mapping project, using ArcMap with hi-res digital aerial photography and GPS tracks to delineate avalanche paths in Tuckerman and Huntington Ravine on Mount Washington, New Hampshire. The Mt Washington Avalanche Center's daily advisory has been integrated with the USFS National Avalanche Map, http://national-map.jhavalanche.org. Using PHP, a WordPress plug-in was developed for MWAC's website, adding custom admin controls and database fields to store avalanche hazard ratings in the MySQL Post_Meta table, and updating the RSS feed to publish a daily hazard rating. A polygon for Tuckerman & Huntington Ravines was added to the national map's geoJSON Google Map overlay, and the daily advisory posts from New Hampshire update the Forest Service's National Avalanche Map, showing the current color-coded avalanche forecast for Mount Washington... A free "Avalanche Forecasts" mobile app for IOS and Android, AvalancheForecasts.com, now uses that daily MWAC RSS feed to show the Tuckerman & Huntington Ravines avalanche forecast. Future development for the 2016 season include MWAC avalanche forecast polygons for 18 gullies with individual XML feeds, overlayed in a Google Map with current weather conditions from the Mount Washington Observatory's summit and regional weather stations; and a 3-D map using the Cesium javascript library, combining the MWAC & MWObs overlays with a choice of base maps, including Bing Maps aerial imagery, ESRI's World Image Server...; a Steep Slopes Analysis overlay of avalanche terrain in the WMNF, generated with Spatial Analyst;

Speakers
JH

Jonathan Hall

Randolph Mountain Club



Tuesday November 10, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Lake Champlain A

1:30pm

A Call for Action — The 3D Elevation Program Initiative Provides Opportunities for State and Local Government
Dan Walters, USGS National Geospatial Program

The Department of the Interior's U.S. Geological Survey and other Federal agencies are launching a 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) designed to bring Federal agencies, academia, corporate entities, states, tribes, and communities together to develop advanced 3-dimensional mapping data of the United States. These data and related tools will be used in the areas of flood risk management, storm water management, mitigation of coastal erosion and storm surge impacts, and as an essential component of supporting action on climate resilience and adaptation. 3DEP data are critical to many more applications, as documented in the 2012 National Enhanced Elevation Assessment (NEEA). The presentation will outline the results of the NEEA study and provide state and local officials the details they need to prepare for,support and take advantage of 3DEP.

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Walters

Daniel Walters

National Map Liaison, USGS
3DEP, NHD, Penn State football and UMaine hockey


Tuesday November 10, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Lake Champlain B

1:30pm

Sewer and Stormwater Asset Migration to ESRI's LGIM
Jessica Gooch*, City of Portland, ME; Justin Futia, City of Portland

In 2015 the City of Portland’s Water Resources Department completed the migration of their sewer and stormwater assets to ESRI’s Local Government Information Model. This presentation will give an overview of the LGIM, the process that was used to convert the data and the benefits that the City has seen since the conversion. We will also include a brief overview of Attribute Assistant, Water Utility Network tools and Data Reviewer.

Speakers
avatar for Jessica Gooch

Jessica Gooch

Asset & Information Manager, City of Portland, Maine
Hi there!!! I am currently the Asset and Information Manager for the City of Portland, ME Water Resources Division. I am currently working on integrating the City's GIS, CMMS and CCTV software to better manage all of our sewer and stormwater assets.



Tuesday November 10, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm
VT Conference Room

2:00pm

New Jersey's Habitat Change Analysis Project
Patrick Woerner*, NJ Division of Fish and Wildlife John Reiser, Rowan University

Wildlife habitat change trend information is a necessary and fundamental component for successful assessment and management of wildlife species. Habitat loss and fragmentation continue to be the two most serious threats to wildlife populations. To effectively protect endangered and threatened species populations and to evaluate protection and management efforts, it is important for wildlife agencies to actively identify and monitor habitat for each listed species. New Jersey’s Division of Fish and Wildlife adopted a habitat change analysis approach to track wildlife habitat transition and fragmentation trends over time. The programmatic GIS analysis approach extracts potential habitat from available Land Use/Land Cover (LULC) data based on species habitat associations and range extents. The analysis spans four time periods between 1986 and 2012. Analysis outputs provide readily available, up-to-date, multi-level, species-specific habitat change information to support agency initiatives. Resulting maps and data serve as a guide to help prioritize work for particular species and their habitats and provide baseline information for the development of species status assessments and recovery plans. Outputs also provide a basis for additional analyses such as evaluating habitat change in regulated vs. unregulated areas, evaluating habitat conservation planning efforts, and other land-use planning, land management and preservation efforts.

Speakers
JR

John Reiser

Rowan University
PW

Patrick Woerner

NJDEP Division of Fish and Wildlife
Patrick Woerner is a GIS Specialist with NJ Fish & Wildlife since 2003. His responsibilities include analysis and development of geospatial data related to conservation of endangered and threatened wildlife species. John J Reiser, GISP is a Business Intelligence Analyst at Rowan University in Glassboro, NJ. John has been a GIS user for over ten years and is an active contributor to several open source GIS projects. John runs several web sites... Read More →



Tuesday November 10, 2015 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Green Mountain C

2:00pm

Creating a High School Environmental Studies Course Utilizing ArcGIS Online and ConnectED
Lauren Amaturo*, Science Theme Coach, CREC Two Rivers Magnet High School; Tom Brodnitzki, Humanities Curriculum Coordinator, CREC; John Limeburner*, GIS Instructor, CREC Two Rivers Magnet High School

Participants in this presentation will learn about how an environmental science magnet school in Hartford, CT designed and successfully implemented an environmental studies course focusing on Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The presenters will provide tips and suggestions on how to successfully incorporate Esri's ArcGIS Online program into the secondary school (6-12) classroom. Participants will also gain access to sample lessons and resources that can be used when writing a course in GIS for their local middle or high school.

Speakers
LA

Lauren Amaturo

Two Rivers Magnet High School
JL

John Limeburner

CREC Two Rivers Magnet High School


Tuesday November 10, 2015 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Montpelier A

2:00pm

Building native applications for your mobile devices with AppStudio
Jeff Bigos*, Esri

Creating a native application for your iOS or Android or Windows device has never been easier. See how to get started with AppStudio, and take your web maps into branded apps.

Speakers


Tuesday November 10, 2015 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Green Mountain A

2:00pm

Looking for the beach – the ancient shoreline of the Champlain Sea
Caroline Alves – USDA / NRCS

Lidar can provide a whole new window into the landscape and can reveal previously unnoticed clues to surficial geologic features. It has proved invaluable in discerning locations of ancient shorelines. The current configuration of Lake Champlain has undergone many transformations in the past 13,000 years. As glaciers receded and the land surface was depressed, salt water invaded the Champlain Valley for a period of time - from what is now the St Lawrence River. Archeologists in search of evidence of Paleo-Indian habitation are focused on investigating areas near to the ancient shoreline of the Champlain Sea. Early native people inhabited landforms adjacent to the edge of this ancient sea and it was certainly a travel corridor. By integrating data from a wide variety of sources, the location of the shoreline can be determined with greater accuracy. Information on delta elevations, surficial deposits, archeological evidence and soils data are being combined to better define the location of the Champlain Sea. There are many benefits to this work including preservation of archeological sites and insights into current water quality issues that plague Vermont’s largest lake.

Speakers


Tuesday November 10, 2015 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Green Mountain B

2:00pm

Vermont’s Map Driven Next Generation 9-1-1 System
Jeremy McMullen,  Angus McCusker – Vermont 911

This presentation will provide an overview of Vermont’s Next Generation 9-1-1 System, including GIS-based MSAG ranges, data rich web/mobile map applications for dispatchers and responders, and identifying Vermont residents who would require special assistance in an emergency event for the C.A.R.E. (Citizen Assistance Registration for Emergencies) program.



Tuesday November 10, 2015 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Lake Champlain A

2:00pm

Field Survey Planning in Remote Areas using Imagery and Route Analysis
Brett Shaver*, ERM; Simon Ross, ERM

Field surveys in remote areas can be challenging to plan and execute safely due to poor quality of local road data and hazard locations. Health & Safety protocols for remote field surveys, which many companies require, dictate detailed requirements for journey planning including: stop times, pre-determined rest areas, speed limits and identification of travel hazards. This presentation will focus on planning field surveys for an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) conducted in Turkey for Oil & Gas exploration. The project required many complex field mobilizations to remote areas, which often times lasted several weeks. In order to safely and efficiently plan the field mobilizations, satellite imagery was acquired and a road network was created and shared with the project team on a Web-GIS viewer. Network analyst tools were used for route optimization and delivery of maps, tabular summaries and GPS data to the field teams. These products, created using GIS and remote sensing, enabled the field teams to conduct their investigations in the most time efficient manner, significantly reducing the number of survey days required to visit all target sites and avoiding potential driving hazards.

Speakers
BS

Brett Shaver

Environmental Resources Management


Tuesday November 10, 2015 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Lake Champlain B

2:00pm

GIS for Asset Management
Rick Martens, James W. Sewall Company

Managing assets such as stormwater/water/wastewater systems, roads and facilities within a community is becoming an increasingly important task for municipalities. However, communities are discouraged when presented with the costs and time required for incorporation of asset management systems within their business processes. Without an accurate inventory system to track and manage assets, it can be difficult to mitigate potential costly and sometimes life-threatening impacts to infrastructure. This presentation will identify the key components of an asset management system and how communities can utilize a Geographic Information System (GIS) as a starting point for effective asset management. GIS is a primary tool that can build the inventory database required for asset management. From this database, other GIS tools can be utilized to analyze, inspect and report on asset condition and potential system risk. The presentation will also cover how GIS can replace current asset inventory and inspection strategies with more efficient methods, reducing time to perform tasks.

Speakers
RM

Rick Martens

James W. Sewall Company



Tuesday November 10, 2015 2:00pm - 2:30pm
VT Conference Room

2:30pm

Mapping Transportation Flood Resiliency
Central Vermont Regional Planning Commission *Daniel Currier and Steve Gladczuk DuBois & King Inc Matthew Murawski PE Bear Creek Environmental, LLC Mary Nealon

Flood inundation and erosion caused widespread damage during Tropic Storm Irene. Many towns are still struggling with the costs of repairing infrastructure from the widespread damage. CVRPC staff with assistance from our consultant team developed a GIS methodology and analysis of selected transportation and drainage systems including roadways, ditches, culverts, bridges, and stream banks that where or could be impacted by flooding and erosion. Once identified these sites where field verified and solutions where developed to help reduce the impact of future flooding and erosion. This presentation will discuss the developed methodology, analyses, and the field verification results.

Speakers
DC

Daniel Currier

Central Vermont Regional Planning Commission
SG

Steve Gladczuk

Central Vermont Regional Planning Commission
MM

Matthew Murawski

DuBois & King Inc
MN

Mary Nealon

Bear Creek Environmental, LLC



Tuesday November 10, 2015 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Green Mountain C

2:30pm

Using Python in ArcGIS: Why? How?
Jeff Bigos*, Esri

Python continues to be an important component in the ArcGIS platform for creating custom tools, administrative scripts, and geoprocessing workflows.  Get a short orientation as to why you should add Python to your arsenal of skills.

Speakers


Tuesday November 10, 2015 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Green Mountain A

2:30pm

Mapping Salt Marshes in New England’s National Estuarine Research Reserves
Jamie Carter, The Baldwin Group at NOAA OCM; Nate Herold, NOAA OCM; Chris Robinson, The Baldwin Group at NOAA OCM

Detailed salt marsh maps are an important component of the National Estuarine Research Reserves’ management plans. Salt marshes perform many ecological functions and provide a suite of ecosystem services. The NERRs and other natural resource management entities are concerned about trends in salt marsh loss and change. The effort presented here will describe techniques NOAA and our partners are employing to develop detailed maps for these environments using high-resolution imagery and lidar and various data derivatives in a data fusion and object segmentation approach.

Speakers
JC

Jamie Carter

Sr. Remote Sensing Analyst, The Baldwin Group at NOAA OCM
Jamie Carter is a remote sensing analyst with NOAA’s Office for Coastal Management (OCM) and serves coastal communities primarily in the Northeast Region. He has a bachelor’s degree in Ecology from Tulane University, a master’s degree in Physical Geography from Oregon State University, and over 10 years of experience developing and delivering geospatial decision support tools to strengthen coastal management and planning. Jamie’s core... Read More →
NH

Nate Herold

NOAA OCM
CR

Chris Robinson

The Baldwin Group at NOAA OCM



Tuesday November 10, 2015 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Green Mountain B

2:30pm

Reshaping your GIS for Emergency Situations
Michael Funaro*, Latitude Geographics

Do you or your agency directly or indirectly support emergency operations? Maybe you provide data or support tools that are used by an emergency manager and their response teams. In this day and age, the tools and applications that help to support communications and decision making in an emergency situation have grown to the point of application overload. You and your organization already have a foundation for supporting your data and applications. It is more important now than ever that you use your GIS to pull all your information together in a very easy to use and intuitive GIS interface. This presentation explores innovative ways to re-shape GIS your capabilities to allow unprecedented connectivity between incident commanders and field responders, particularly through streamlined, touch-friendly map presentation. Discover how to implement rapid-entry map collaboration channels for map-and-marker planning, and collect relevant data, including social media images, for maximum awareness in the field.

Speakers
MF

Michael Funaro

Latitude Geographics



Tuesday November 10, 2015 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Lake Champlain A

2:30pm

Electric Utility GIS conversion and User Products
Thomas Mitchell*, Eversource Energy, Ron Rioux, Eversource Energy

Eversource's Electric Utiltiy 13,000 miles of line and infrastructure was on old AutoCAD drawings. Although supposedly spaitially correct, they were not. There was no connectivity. Department data sources were in different spots. Eversource (then PSNH) did a project to copnvert all our old paper and sources to digitial and into a GIS. From there, access was need by users, primairly in the field (lineworkers, Field electricians), to the GIS system. Different iterations were tried. The first was a grided system of the state with our infratsturcure overlayed. This resulted in five to ten times the number of maps compared with autoCAD. Next we went to a tablet with a cached versionof the GIS. This was well recieved by some, but not all were technology adept. Finally, a pared down versiion called Storm Restoraiton Maps were prioduced. It was clearly readable, half the maps compared to AutoCad, and was on a readable landbase.

Speakers
RR

Ron Rioux

Eversource Energy



Tuesday November 10, 2015 2:30pm - 3:00pm
VT Conference Room
 
Wednesday, November 11
 

8:45am

App Showcase: Collector for ArcGIS, online and offline workflows
Mark Scott*, Esri 

Collect data live in the field, or take your data and basemaps offline into areas where you cannot connect to your ArcGIS Online Organization, collect your information, then sync it back up when you are back online.

Speakers
avatar for Mark Scott

Mark Scott

Solutions Engineer, Esri
Mark Scott received a B.S. degree in Surveying Engineering at The University of Maine in 1984. He has over 7 years of practical surveying and engineering experience, and over 20 years industry experience in the technical sales and marketing of Computer Aided Design and Drafting (CAD) systems, engineering software, and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Since joining Esri, in 1997, Mark has supported the efforts of Esri account executives, Esri... Read More →



Wednesday November 11, 2015 8:45am - 9:15am
Montpelier

8:45am

Map Accuracy Standards
Ted Covill, CP, PPS-WSP

There are a few accuracy standards that are currently in use (National Map Accuracy Standards, ASPRS, etc.). What are the histories and background of these standards? What are the differences between the standards and what can you expect from your mapping product. What standards should you ask for if you are writing the specifications for a mapping project? How do these standards relate to actual coordinate positions?

Speakers
avatar for Ted Covill

Ted Covill

Manager Photogrammetry, WSP
Patriots, Red Sox, Bruins, Celtics and Bruce Springsteen. Oh yeah, mapping too!


Wednesday November 11, 2015 8:45am - 9:15am
Lake Champlain B

8:45am

Implementing a GIS-based Zoning Map
Douglas Greenfield, City of Newton, MA

Like many towns and cities, Newton, Massachusetts has been using a paper-based Zoning map for decades. This set of maps is torn, faded, incomplete and unreadable in places. To see a property's official zoning requires a look at several map sheets in combination with a list of ordinances. City staff scanned all the maps, went through all zoning ordinances and constructed a GIS data layer that can now be considered the official zoning map of the city. The technical and legal challenges and steps to implementation will be discussed.

Speakers
DG

Douglas Greenfield

City of Newton, MA



Wednesday November 11, 2015 8:45am - 9:15am
Lake Champlain A

8:45am

Census Data for the GIS User: Some tips and tricks for downloading data and shapefiles together.
David Kraiker, Census Bureau (NY Office)

This workshop explains Census Bureau concepts, including data years and geography types, and works with the class attendees to mine for data within the Census American Factfinder (AFF) portal with particular emphasis on spatial searches.  It also explains some ways of creating and downloading shapefiles directly from AFF.  Bring your own laptop!  Space is limited. Sign up at the Conference Registration Desk.

Speakers
DK

David Kraiker

Data Dissemination Specialist, Census Bureau, NY Office
David Kraiker has worked at the Census Bureau out of the New York City office for the past 18 years. For the past 2 years he has worked in Data Dissemination, teaching and instructing clients in how to download and use Census data. Previously he worked as a Geographer for the Census Bureau, as well as a cartographer at Hammond Maps, Inc. and Geonex. He attended Clark University and Rutgers-Newark. He presently lives in South Orange, NJ... Read More →


Wednesday November 11, 2015 8:45am - 10:15am
Green Mountain C

8:45am

GIS Support for Invasive Plant Species Management
*Scott Lehto, The Kenerson Group; Yao Zhoe, The Kenerson Group; Jeffrey M Taylor, Vegetation Control Service, Inc.

Invasive plant species pose a significant threat to the natural diversity of our ecosystem. They impact our native species, including rare, threatened and endangered species. They threaten the use, enjoyment and value of our property and woodlands. Invasive plant species already cover well over one million acres in the United States and continue to increase in population by 8-20% annually. This threat is recognized throughout the Northeast and many federal, state, non-profit and private entities are working to contain and manage these aggressive invaders. GIS is a key tool in this effort. It is pertinent in the planning and approval process with state and federal agencies and it also aids in communicating vital information with landowners, field staff, abuttors and the public at large. In this discussion, The Kenerson Group and Vegetation Control Service, Inc. will outline the process from project proposal through treatment completion.

Speakers
SL

Scott Lehto

The Kenerson Group
JM

Jeffrey M Taylor

Vegetation Control Service, Inc.
YZ

Yao Zhoe

The Kenerson Group


Wednesday November 11, 2015 8:45am - 10:15am
Green Mountain B

8:45am

Exploiting the incredible potential of unmanned aerial systems (drones) - an in-depth look at the technology and its many applications.
Stephen Keen, geoResource Technologies Inc.

Small Unmanned Aerial Systems (sUAS) - commonly called drones - are an emerging technology that has the potential to be integrated with many of the same fields that currently use Geographic Information System (GIS) technologies. UAS provide the GIS community access to another method of data collection using a wide variety of sensors such as video, RGB, infrared, thermal and LiDAR. This workshop will investigate the current regulations, aerial platforms, sensors, flying techniques, data processing, mapping products and end-user applications for this exciting new technology. Attendees will be able to get a good look at a number of different platforms and there will be an open discussion about the advantages and disadvantages of different solutions and how they potentially fit into the workflow of number of industries, including engineering, agriculture, natural resources, forestry and disaster management. 

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Keen

Stephen Keen

President, geoResource Technologies, Inc.


Wednesday November 11, 2015 8:45am - 10:15am
VT Conference Room

9:15am

App Showcase: Navigator for ArcGIS
Brent Pierce*, Esri

Navigator is a new app available to ArcGIS Online users.  See how it works with Collector, and will use Esri data as well as your own data to provide turn-by-turn directions to multiple stops for your workforce needs. Presented by the Esri Apps team from Portland, ME.

Speakers

Wednesday November 11, 2015 9:15am - 9:45am
Montpelier

9:15am

Using GIS for Precision Agriculture Conservation
John Waterman, GISP, PMP

This presentation will discuss a new approach to utilizing GIS to help reduce soil loss on farms. For precision conservation to be practical and effective, farmers and agronomist must have tools that can pinpoint conservation needs. Using GIS on the web, conservation practitioners can quickly and easily target appropriate management practices to landscape positions that contribute the most significant sediment loads and evaluate which practice alternatives provide the most environmental benefit. Traditionally, this process was time consuming on the desktop and required scientific and professional knowledge. Moving to a simple web based front-end and cloud back-end, now requires no previous GIS experience to produce complex analysis in short order. This presentation will review the front-end as well as technical mechanics of the solution.


Wednesday November 11, 2015 9:15am - 9:45am
Lake Champlain B

9:15am

More than Maples: The Ecological Benefits of Street Trees in Syracuse, New York
Emily Bukowski*, Syracuse University

Street trees are an integral part of urban forest management plans. They provide a variety of benefits to the communities they are planted in, such as atmospheric carbon dioxide reductions, energy savings, storm water mitigation and increased aesthetic value. Working with partners from the City of Syracuse and Onondaga Earth Corps, Syracuse Community Geography addressed a number of questions regarding the city’s urban forest, such as: How are street trees distributed by neighborhood? What environmental and health benefits do these trees provide the communities they are located within? How do neighborhoods compare to each other regarding street tree distribution and benefits? Using data from the City Arborist, we created a map-book of 31 Syracuse neighborhoods that includes a map of all street trees by size class, a size class histogram, a table listing top species in the neighborhood, other descriptive statistics about the neighborhood’s street trees, and a breakdown of the benefits provided by those trees as calculated by the US Forest Service’s i-Tree program. We found that street tree distribution varies greatly between neighborhoods, thus creating an unequal distribution of ecosystem services provided by those trees.

Speakers
EB

Emily Bukowski

Syracuse University



Wednesday November 11, 2015 9:15am - 9:45am
Lake Champlain A

9:45am

App Showcase: Workforce for ArcGIS
Brent Pierce*, Esri

Workforce for ArcGIS is a soon-to-be-released app that will integrate field data collection (Collector), getting to work locations (Navigator) into an app that includes work order information for you r teams in the field.  Come see this interesting new app, presented by the Esri Apps team from Portland, ME.

Speakers

Wednesday November 11, 2015 9:45am - 10:15am
Montpelier

9:45am

Sweet Tea and Geography - GIS Trends from the North Carolina ArcGIS Users Group
Chuck Wright, GISP

This will be an overview of GIS trends and use cases at the State and Local Government level. This will include how GIS data is coordinated in the State, as well as specific stories of how GIS is successfully applied at a departmental level. We will be touching on the transformative capabilities brought about by currently available technologies.

Speakers


Wednesday November 11, 2015 9:45am - 10:15am
Lake Champlain A

10:30am

Build, Manage, and Publish your Mosaic Dataset
Jake Skinner*, Esri

Use Mosaic datasets to manage your image data, and toss away your old raster catalogs.  Mosaic Datasets allow you to quickly integrate new data into your imagery, while maintaining the old data. Let us show you how.

Speakers


Wednesday November 11, 2015 10:30am - 11:00am
Montpelier

10:30am

Getting Started Developing JavaScript Web Apps: A BYOD Hands-On Workshop
John Waterman, GISP, PMP

This workshop will discuss how to get started with the ArcGIS JavaScript API. We will cover the basics for getting started, design techniques, best practices, and tips and tricks. Please bring you laptop to start writing code. All you need is Google Chrome. The presentation will be interactive. Space is limited; attendees must sign-up in advance to participate. The sign-up sheet will be located at the conference registration desk onsite. 


Wednesday November 11, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
Green Mountain B

10:30am

Mobile Data Workflows Using Collector for ArcGIS: A BYOD Hands-On Workshop
Mark Scott, Esri

Collector for ArcGIS is an app running on iOS or Android devices, that allows you to collect data in the field, and submit it via a portal to ArcGIS for Server or ArcGIS Online. In this workshop, the instructor will review ArcGIS Online Organizations, set up each student with an identity, and set up a map for field editing. Students will be assigned to groups, set up the map on their own device, and then go outside to collect data. If weather does not cooperate, we will collect data inside the hotel. The groups will re-convene, and look at the results in a dashboard. IMPORTANT: This is Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) workshop. Students must bring an iPhone, iPad, or Android phone or tablet, with Collector installed on it. Space is limited; attendees must sign-up in advance to participate. The sign-up sheet will be located at the conference registration desk onsite. 

Speakers
avatar for Mark Scott

Mark Scott

Solutions Engineer, Esri
Mark Scott received a B.S. degree in Surveying Engineering at The University of Maine in 1984. He has over 7 years of practical surveying and engineering experience, and over 20 years industry experience in the technical sales and marketing of Computer Aided Design and Drafting (CAD) systems, engineering software, and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Since joining Esri, in 1997, Mark has supported the efforts of Esri account executives, Esri... Read More →



Wednesday November 11, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
Lake Champlain A

10:30am

Python, Unwieldy Data, and Your Geoprocessing Sanity
Jason Wise, Terracon

Does this sound familiar? You need to process a lot of data, or you need to run the same process repeatedly. You build geoprocessing models to make things easier, but then the models become as complex and unwieldy as your data, or they don't quite do what you need. You turn to Python scripting to improve your geoprocessing, and pretty soon you have complex and unwieldy Python code. Then you try ArcGIS Pro and discover that your scripts no longer work. Learn how you can improve your geoprocessing sanity by taking an object-oriented approach to Python programming. Make your code easier to understand, reuse, and maintain. We'll also discuss scripting versus models, Python toolboxes versus regular toolboxes, publishing geoprocessing services, and the different versions of Python (2.7 and 3.4) that different Esri products use. Bring your own laptop!  Space is limited. Sign up at the Conference Registration Desk.

Speakers
JW

Jason Wise

Terracon



Wednesday November 11, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
Green Mountain C

10:30am

Managing Data in the Modern ArcGIS Environment
Michael Mannion, Mannion Geosystems

Since the advent of the ArcGIS platform at the turn of this century, "data management" has been largely synonymous with "geodatabase management". As ArcGIS continues its burgeoning growth to meet the needs of new user communities, particularly non-GIS professionals, so have the options for managing geospatial content. This session focuses on helping decision makers who are evaluating, or are transitioning to, an ArcGIS Online or ArcGIS for Portal environment understand the available data management options and choose among them. Topics include: local and cloud-based storage; geodatabases, the ArcGIS Data Store, and hosted ArcGIS Online layers; publishing data as ArcGIS for Server services; mobile data access and editing; and synchronizing data across multiple repositories and networks. No prerequisite knowledge is required, though a working understanding of ArcGIS will be helpful. 

Speakers
MM

Michael Mannion

Mannion Geosystems


Wednesday November 11, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
Green Mountain A

10:30am

Measuring for Success
Mark Goetz, GBRC, Michael Funaro, Latitude Geographics, Brett Flodine, CIty of Hartford

What are the tools used to measure the performance, usability and value of your GIS system? This panel will discuss the types of measures that indicate systems are functioning as designed, used as intended and performing at its peak. There are many tools used to measure system performance and different elements of the system that require monitoring such as server operating system, relational databases, GIS Servers, Web Servers, ArcGIS Online and web traffic are just a few of the elements that should be monitored not only to troubleshooting issues and fine tuning performance but also provide usage statistics. From the simple to the sophisticated, the tools are used to inform IT/GIS administrators their systems are functioning properly but also can provide reportable levels of activity to upper management. It’s within the activity usage that the value of the system can be evaluated. How do you measure usage? How do you determine the value of your GIS system? The panel will discuss the tools and techniques used in their positions but also engage the audience to share their experiences with measuring their success.

Speakers
BF

Brett Flodine

GIS Project Leader, City of Hartford
MF

Michael Funaro

Latitude Geographics



Wednesday November 11, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
Lake Champlain B

10:30am

UAS for your GIS
Jarlath O'Neil-Dunne*, University of Vermont; Jon Budreski*, Airshark 

The UAS workshop will give you hands-on experience with fixed-wing and multi-roter UAS from flight planning, to flight operations (weather permitting), to data processing and analysis. The University of Vermont’s UAS team and personnel from Airshark, Vermont’s first commercial UAS operator, will be on-hand to answer your questions.

Speakers

Wednesday November 11, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
VT Conference Room

11:00am

Sharing your image data using ArcGIS for Server and ArcGIS Online
Jake Skinner*, Esri

So you have stored your image data in a Mosaic Dataset.  See the best practices for sharing that with other users.

Speakers


Wednesday November 11, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
Montpelier

11:30am

LiDAR, LAS, and LAZ in ArcGIS: A Primer
Jake Skinner*, Esri

ArcGIS continues to add capabilities for working with LiDAR data. Come get an introduction to the tools available.

Speakers


Wednesday November 11, 2015 11:30am - 12:00pm
Montpelier